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Gross anatomy of the liver
 
06:21
Plastinated detached human liver. Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Abood Jaffar. Filmed by Mr Nasser Zahra at College of Medicine, University of Sharjah. Related video: Dissection of the liver: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kcfwKVZgolM This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Views: 354800 Human Anatomy Education
Osteology of the Skull: 10 Ethmoid Bone
 
01:57
This video is part of the playlist "Osteology of the skull": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0zwMUuDPnLjZxDkS7s4XyRb&feature=view_all . The list deals with the study of the skull bones in articulated skulls according to views (normas); in addition the playlist contains videos that describe some separate bones of the skull including: the mandible, sphenoid, ethmoid, and palatine. There is also a brief summary of the features of the newborn skull. Although each video can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the playlist is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Osteology of the skull: 1 introduction 2. Osteology of the Skull: 2 superior view 3. Osteology of the Skull: 3 posterior view 4. Osteology of the Skull: 4 lateral view 5. Osteology of the Skull: 5 inferior view 6. Osteology of the Skull: 6 cranial cavity 7. Osteology of the Skull: 7 anterior view 8. Osteology of the Skull: 8 The Mandible 9. Osteology of the Skull: 9 Sphenoid Bone 10. Osteology of the Skull: 10 Ethmoid Bone 11. Osteology of the Skull: 11 Palatine Bone 12. Osteology of the Skull: 12 The Newborn Skull Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Ahmed Thaer Zahidi (Medical student). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, April, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Anatomy of the accommodation reflex
 
04:52
After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Understand the functional significance of the accommodation reflex Describe and map the anatomical components involved in the accommodation reflex Compare the pathway of the accommodation reflex to that of the light reflex Identify where the light reflex dissociates from the accommodation reflex Explain the development of Argyll-Robertson pupil Related videos: Corneal reflex https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cldYYtejPwo Anatomy of the light reflexes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNmA_lNTVL4 Midbrain, simplified sections of internal structure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gQuznVG1F8 Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Osteology of the Skull 9 Sphenoid Bone
 
05:24
This video is part of the playlist "Osteology of the skull": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0zwMUuDPnLjZxDkS7s4XyRb&feature=view_all . The list deals with the study of the skull bones in articulated skulls according to views (normas); in addition the playlist contains videos that describe some separate bones of the skull including: the mandible, sphenoid, ethmoid, and palatine. There is also a brief summary of the features of the newborn skull. Although each video can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the playlist is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Osteology of the skull: 1 introduction 2. Osteology of the Skull: 2 superior view 3. Osteology of the Skull: 3 posterior view 4. Osteology of the Skull: 4 lateral view 5. Osteology of the Skull: 5 inferior view 6. Osteology of the Skull: 6 cranial cavity 7. Osteology of the Skull: 7 anterior view 8. Osteology of the Skull: 8 The Mandible 9. Osteology of the Skull: 9 Sphenoid Bone 10. Osteology of the Skull: 10 Ethmoid Bone 11. Osteology of the Skull: 11 Palatine Bone 12. Osteology of the Skull: 12 The Newborn Skull Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Ahmed Thaer Zahidi (Medical student). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, April, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Views: 115239 Human Anatomy Education
Anatomical relations of the spleen
 
04:02
After completion of this video session it is expected that you will be able to: • Identify the anatomical position and relations of a detached spleen. • Explain the significance of the splenic notch. Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Mr.Nasser Zahra (Lab technician) at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, 2013. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Osteology of the Skull: 11 Palatine Bone
 
03:07
This video is part of the playlist "Osteology of the skull": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0zwMUuDPnLjZxDkS7s4XyRb&feature=view_all . The list deals with the study of the skull bones in articulated skulls according to views (normas); in addition the playlist contains videos that describe some separate bones of the skull including: the mandible, sphenoid, ethmoid, and palatine. There is also a brief summary of the features of the newborn skull. Although each video can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the playlist is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Osteology of the skull: 1 introduction 2. Osteology of the Skull: 2 superior view 3. Osteology of the Skull: 3 posterior view 4. Osteology of the Skull: 4 lateral view 5. Osteology of the Skull: 5 inferior view 6. Osteology of the Skull: 6 cranial cavity 7. Osteology of the Skull: 7 anterior view 8. Osteology of the Skull: 8 The Mandible 9. Osteology of the Skull: 9 Sphenoid Bone 10. Osteology of the Skull: 10 Ethmoid Bone 11. Osteology of the Skull: 11 Palatine Bone 12. Osteology of the Skull: 12 The Newborn Skull Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Ahmed Thaer Zahidi (Medical student). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, April, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Pericardium - dissection
 
05:25
This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation After watching this video, it is expected that you will be able to • Identify the layers of the pericardium: fibrous and serous (parietal/visceral). • Identify the attachments of fibrous pericardium: sternum and central tendon of the diaphragm. • Locate the transverse & oblique sinuses of pericardium and their relations. • Identify the phrenic nerve and list the structures it supplies. Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Miss Faiza Abdirisaq (Medical student). The session was attended by second year MBBS students at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, 27 September 2011.
Anal Canal - Simplified Anatomy
 
11:51
After watching this video you will be able to: Define and describe the internal features of the anal canal: pectinate line, anal columns, valves and sinuses. Describe the anal sphincters (internal and external) and provide a comparison between them in relation to type of muscle fibers, extent, innervation and relation to puborectalis. Describe the venous drainage of the anal canal and demonstrate the presence of a portocaval anastomosis. Identify the position of the anal cushions. Discuss the significance of internal rectal venous plexus and arteriovenous anastomosis. Compare between between the upper and lower part of the anal canal in relation to: embryological origin, lining epithelium, arterial blood supply, venous drainage, lymphatic drainage, nerve supply and internal features. Discuss the applied anatomy of internal and external hemorrhoids in relation to their location, formation, predisposing factors, pain sensation, and susceptibility to bleeding. Identify the location of the anal fissure and provide the anatomical explanation for the associated pain and spasm. Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. February 2013 This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation Related accounts Twitter https://twitter.com/AkramJaffar Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation SlideShare http://www.slideshare.net/AkramJaffar LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/akram-abood-jaffar-17526830 Research gate https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Akram_Jaffar Medtube https://medtube.net/users/akram-jaffar Instagram https://www.instagram.com/akramjaffar Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/akramjaffar/ Tumblr https://www.tumblr.com/blog/akramjaffar Vimeo https://vimeo.com/user9371641 Academia https://dal.academia.edu/AkramJaffar Google + https://plus.google.com/+akramjfr Tsu http://www.tsu.co/Anatomy_Education MySpace https://myspace.com/akram.jaffar
Views: 181537 Human Anatomy Education
Peritoneum - dissection
 
07:47
Objectives: After completion of this video session it is expected that the students will be able to understand and demonstrate the: • Layers of peritoneum: visceral and parietal peritoneum • Subdivisions of the peritoneal cavity: Greater and lesser sacs • Relationship of the viscera to the peritoneum: intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal • Peritoneal formations: Peritoneal ligaments; Omenta (Greater omentum, Lesser omentum); Mesenteries (Mesentery of the small intestine, Transverse mesocolon, Sigmoid mesocolon); ligaments (gastrocolic, falciform, and ligamentum teres hepatis) • Boundaries of the eipiploic foramen (of Winslow). • Peritoneal spaces: Subphrenic spaces: right and left subphrenic spaces, hepatorenal pouch. • Paracolic gutters. Related video, tracing peritoneum in sections (simplified) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_biMT6u1hY Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Faiza Abdirisaq and Farah El-Sawy (Medical students). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Peritoneal folds of anterior abdominal wall
 
03:01
After the end of this video, you are expected to 1-identify the peritoneal folds of the posterior aspect of the anterior abdominal wall. 2-correlate the embryological origin of the median and medial umbilical folds and the round ligament of the liver. 3-identify the lateral umbilical fold, its content and its relation to rectus abdominis muscle. Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Captured by using GoPro Hero3 camera. Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, February, 2013. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Osteology of the skull: 2 Superior View
 
05:39
Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Ahmed Thaer Zahidi (Medical student). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, April, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation This video is part of the playlist "Osteology of the skull": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0zwMUuDPnLjZxDkS7s4XyRb&feature=view_all . The list deals with the study of the skull bones in articulated skulls according to views (normas); in addition the playlist contains videos that describe some separate bones of the skull including: the mandible, sphenoid, ethmoid, and palatine. There is also a brief summary of the features of the newborn skull. Although each video can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the playlist is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Osteology of the skull: 1 introduction 2. Osteology of the Skull: 2 superior view 3. Osteology of the Skull: 3 posterior view 4. Osteology of the Skull: 4 lateral view 5. Osteology of the Skull: 5 inferior view 6. Osteology of the Skull: 6 cranial cavity 7. Osteology of the Skull: 7 anterior view 8. Osteology of the Skull: 8 The Mandible 9. Osteology of the Skull: 9 Sphenoid Bone 10. Osteology of the Skull: 10 Ethmoid Bone 11. Osteology of the Skull: 11 Palatine Bone 12. Osteology of the Skull: 12 The Newborn Skull
Posterior mediastinum - dissection
 
05:38
Objectives: This is a brief digest to demonstrate the contents and relations of the inferior mediastinum including: • Esophagus. • Descending thoracic aorta and its branches. • Azygos system of veins. • Thoracic duct. • Sympathetic trunk and splanchnic nerves. • Vagus nerve and formation of the esophageal plexus. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. Filmed by Mr. Nasser Zahra (Lab technician). Filmed at College of Medicine, University of Sharjah, UAE. November, 2011. The session is attended by second year MBBS students.
Cranial parasympathetic ganglia
 
14:42
After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to List the four cranial parasympathetic ganglia: ciliary, pterygopalatine, otic and submandibular Identify the location of each ganglion Describe the origin of the preganglionic fibers from brain stem nuclei Describe the destination of the postganglionic fibers Follow the course of pre- and post-ganglionic fibers Explain the applied anatomy of gustatory hyperlacrimation (crocodile tears syndrome) Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Female bony pelvis: 3-Pelvimetry
 
08:04
Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (Ph.D.) using a plastic model and PowerPoint slides. Filmed by Mr.Nasser Zahra (Lab Technician). Filmed at the College of Medicine, University of Sharjah, UAE. Also check related videos: Female bony pelvis: 1-relevant osteology http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86OKKjsIQwg Female bony pelvis: 2-sex differences http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYSQkIe0Dcc This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation After watching this video it is expected that you will be able to: Outline the dimensions of the female pelvis at the inlet, outlet and interspinous plane. Discuss the rationale behind rotation of fetal head during passage through the pelvis.
Views: 102437 Human Anatomy Education
Synovial flexor sheaths in the palm
 
02:37
After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Describe the extent of synovial sheaths of the flexor tendons Outline the function of synovial flexor sheaths Define the ulnar bursa, radial bursa, and digital synovial sheaths Explain the spread of infection from radial to ulnar bursa Explain the spread of infection from the tip of the little finger or tip of the thumb to the forearm Locate the discontinuity between ulnar bursa and synovial digital sheaths Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Superior mediastinum - dissection
 
09:33
This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation Related video: Relations at the superior mediastinum, simplified sketches http://youtu.be/KoSIzyL7610 Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. Filmed by Miss Rama Anwar and Wafa Yousef (medical students). Filmed at College of Medicine, University of Sharjah, UAE. November, 2011. Objectives: Demonstrate and describe the contents and relations of the superior mediastinum including: Thymus, superior vena cava, arch of azygos vein, right and left brachiocephalic veins, venous angle, trachea, esophagus, vagus nerve, phrenic nerve, left recurrent laryngeal nerve, ligamentum arteriosum, pulmonary trunk, pulmonary arteries, left superior intercostal vein, ascending aorta, aortic arch, brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery, left subclavian artery.
Anatomy of wrinkle lines and Botox injection sites
 
12:52
This video is part of the playlist "Essential Anatomy for Botox Facial Injections": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0xBCGxUO3PitmIAvDbNb6Ep After watching this video it is expected that you will be able to discuss the anatomy of wrinkle lines in the face in relation to the muscles involved, preferred sites of injections, and possible complications: -- Horizontal lines of the forehead. -- Mephisto sign. -- Lateral brow lift. -- Glabellar lines. -- Crow's feet. -- Bunny lines. -- Marionette lines. -- Cobblestone appearance. -- Gummy smile. -- Nefertiti lift. After watching the whole playlist it is expected that, in addition to the above-mentioned objectives, you will be able to: • Outline muscle groups of the face: muscles of mastication and muscles of facial expression. • Discuss the functional groups of muscles of facial expression: dilator and sphincter mechanisms of the orifices of the face. • Describe the attachment and function of the muscles of facial expression. • Summarize the structure of the upper eyelid in relation to the attachment of levator palpebrae superioris. • Outline the blood supply of the face: branches of internal and external carotid arteries. • Enumerate the motor and cutaneous branches in the face. Although each video in the list can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the playlist is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Anatomy of upper facial muscles: http://youtu.be/m4onZ7NcmTY 2. Anatomy of lower facial muscles: http://youtu.be/LWmKAV2W_Xo 3. Anatomy of wrinkle lines and Botox injection sites 4. Blood and verve supply of the face - outline: http://youtu.be/08OmHn-XzIQ For an abridged version of the playlist, check this video out: http://youtu.be/v53G4ZY1qvg Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (Ph.D.). This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Views: 203341 Human Anatomy Education
Female bony pelvis: 1-relevant osteology
 
05:52
Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (Ph.D.) using a plastic model. Filmed by Mr.Nasser Zahra (Lab Technician). Filmed at the College of Medicine, University of Sharjah, UAE. Also check related videos: Female bony pelvis: 2-sex differences http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYSQkIe0Dcc Female bony pelvis: 3-Pelvimetry http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTwxNTFP-YA This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation After watching this video it is expected that you will be able to: Describe the features of the bones of the pelvis (hip bones, sacrum & coccyx): Position; Parts; Bony features; Articular surfaces; Define the features forming the brim; Pelvic outlet (pubic arch, ischial tuberosity, tip of coccyx).
Views: 264331 Human Anatomy Education
Midbrain external anatomy
 
04:31
After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Describe the gross appearance of the midbrain: corpora quadrigemina, superior brachium, inferior brachium, tectum, interpeduncular fossa, basis pedunculi (crus cerebri), posterior perforated substance, cereral peduncle, substantia nigra, red nucleus, cerebral aquiduct. Identify the sites of emergence of cranial nerves in relation to the above-mentioned landmarks. Related videos: Midbrain, simplified sections of internal structure http://youtu.be/1gQuznVG1F8 Medulla oblongata, external anatomy https://youtu.be/f7aOiFrYS00 Pons, external anatomy https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=lgNIBpvOEZY Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Anatomy of the inguinal region, simplified
 
28:23
Correction from Ahmed Farah Muhumed : the femoral vein forms the lateral border of the femoral ring and not the medial border as stated in 17:25 as correctly stated in 26:26 Check related video: Inguinal region, dissection of a female body http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jp9p016QBvw After completion of this video session it is expected that you will be able to: Gross anatomy Define: Inguinal ligament; Lacunar ligament; Pectineal ligament; Reflected inguinal ligament; Intercrural fibers; Conjoint tendon; Iliopubic tract; Interfoveolar fibers. Describe: the superficial and deep inguinal rings. the anterior/posterior walls, roof and floor of the inguinal canal; boundaries of inguinal triangle of Hasselbach, boundaries of the femoral ring. List: the layers of the spermatic cord (External spermatic fascia, Cremasteric fascia, Internal spermatic fascia); the contents of the spermatic cord: (Ductus deferens, Processus vaginalis (usually a remnant), Arteries, Veins, Nerves, Lymphatics.) Outline the surface markings of: Inguinal ligament; Inferior epigastric artery; Inguinal rings and course of inguinal canal. Embryology Outline the descent of the testis and formation of the gubernaculum and processus vaginalis. Clinical Anatomy Using applied anatomy: Explain the importance of the surface anatomy of the inferior epigastric artery in differentiating between inguinal hernias. Compare the relation of inguinal hernia and femoral hernia to the pubic tubercle. Discuss mechanism, route and diagnosis of herniae: Indirect inguinal, Direct inguinal, and Femoral. Explain why indirect inguinal hernia is more common in young males, indirect inguinal hernia is more common in elderly, while femoral hernia is more common in females. Discuss the formation, relations, and clinical significance of an abnormal obturator artery. Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation Related accounts Twitter https://twitter.com/AkramJaffar Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation SlideShare http://www.slideshare.net/AkramJaffar LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/akram-abood-jaffar-17526830 Research gate https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Akram_Jaffar Medtube https://medtube.net/users/akram-jaffar Instagram https://www.instagram.com/akramjaffar Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/akramjaffar/ Tumblr https://www.tumblr.com/blog/akramjaffar Vimeo https://vimeo.com/user9371641 Academia https://dal.academia.edu/AkramJaffar Google + https://plus.google.com/+akramjfr Tsu http://www.tsu.co/Anatomy_Education MySpace https://myspace.com/akram.jaffar
Views: 386908 Human Anatomy Education
Osteology of the clavicle
 
05:33
After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Describe the osteology of the clavicle Differentiate between right and left clavicles Identify muscle and ligamentous attachment to the clavicle Explain why the clavicle commonly fractures between middle and lateral thirds Outline the ossification of the clavicle Related video: Fracture of the clavicle - applied anatomy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYJTwU8fmJw Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Osteology of the Skull: 8 The Mandible
 
07:58
This video is part of the playlist "Osteology of the skull": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0zwMUuDPnLjZxDkS7s4XyRb&feature=view_all . The list deals with the study of the skull bones in articulated skulls according to views (normas); in addition the playlist contains videos that describe some separate bones of the skull including: the mandible, sphenoid, ethmoid, and palatine. There is also a brief summary of the features of the newborn skull. Although each video can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the playlist is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Osteology of the skull: 1 introduction 2. Osteology of the Skull: 2 superior view 3. Osteology of the Skull: 3 posterior view 4. Osteology of the Skull: 4 lateral view 5. Osteology of the Skull: 5 inferior view 6. Osteology of the Skull: 6 cranial cavity 7. Osteology of the Skull: 7 anterior view 8. Osteology of the Skull: 8 The Mandible 9. Osteology of the Skull: 9 Sphenoid Bone 10. Osteology of the Skull: 10 Ethmoid Bone 11. Osteology of the Skull: 11 Palatine Bone 12. Osteology of the Skull: 12 The Newborn Skull Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Ahmed Thaer Zahidi (Medical student). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, April, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Pons, external anatomy
 
05:27
After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Describe the gross appearance of the pons: Basilar groove, middle cerebellar peduncle, median sulcus, medial eminence, sulcus limitans, facial colliculus, area vestibuli. Identify the sites of emergence of cranial nerves in relation to the above-mentioned landmarks. Related videos: Pons, simplified sections of internal structure http://youtu.be/vi8OKSb0XTM Medulla oblongata, external anatomy https://youtu.be/f7aOiFrYS00 Midbrain, external anatomy https://youtu.be/8fP1or-SyDc Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Surface anatomy of the pleura and thoracocentesis
 
05:27
This video is part of a playlist of short videos which are intended to combine multiple choice questions' answering experience with an improved understanding of anatomy. Most of the questions are of the USMLE-type by being case-based or with clinical vignettes. However, students with little or no clinical training can answer the questions provided that they follow a clinically-oriented approach in their study of anatomy. Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation It is widely accepted that multiple choice examinations are the most objective means available today for testing the theoretical knowledge of large populations of students. They test not only an individual's knowledge but also the more subtle qualities, such as discrimination, judgment, and reasoning. If multiple choice tests are to be most effectively used as educational tools, they should be given to students during the course of studies and not just during the examination at the end of the course. Considering the descriptive nature of anatomy, and the importance of illustrations in grasping and remembering anatomical relationships, diagrams are added. However, they should not be expected to accompany questions in an actual examination setting. In this case the student should visualize these relations in his/her mind's eye before attempting to answer the question.
Anatomy of the corneal reflex
 
01:30
After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Identify afferent and efferent pathways of the corneal reflex Central connections of cranial nerve nuclei involved in the reflex Why the cornea in specific should be used to evoke the reflex Related videos Anatomy of the accommodation reflex https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BMW3vBTFLk Anatomy of the light reflexes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNmA_lNTVL4 Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Anatomy of the small intestine - dissection
 
06:09
Objectives: After completion of this video session it is expected that the students will be able to understand and demonstrate the: • Duodenum: Topography. Peritoneal relations. Parts • Features and relations of the first part of the duodenum • The second part of the duodenum: relations, major and minor duodenal papillae (location and ducts opening through). • Relations of the third part of the duodenum • Mesentery of the small intestine: Contents. • Differences between jejunum and ileum. • Superior mesenteric artery: origin and course. Related video: Differences between jejunum and ileum http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxKka_khbVw Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Faiza Abdirisaq and Farah El-Sawy (Medical students). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
External and internal features of the heart - plastic model
 
12:33
This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation Objectives • Describe: the borders, surfaces, apex & base of the heart • Describe the features of the • Right atrium: Right auricle, Openings of the superior and inferior venae cavae & coronary sinus. Valves of the inferior vena cava and coronary sinus, Interatrial septum, fossa ovalis, limbus, musculi pectinati • Right ventricle: Right AV valve (tricuspid), cusps, chordae tendinae, papillary muscles, Trabecula carnae, infundibulum, pulmonary valve • Left atrium: Left auricle, pulmonary vein orifices • Left ventricle: Left AV valve (mitral), chordae tendineae, papillary muscles, trabecula carnae, aortic vestibule, aortic valve, interventricular septum (membranous and muscular parts) • Describe the relative thickness of the wall of the chambers. • Describe the shape of the right ventricle in comparison to the left. Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Mr Nasser Zahra (Lab technician). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, September 2011.
Views: 142678 Human Anatomy Education
Anatomy of anterior abdominal wall - dissection
 
10:22
Objectives: After completion of this video session it is expected that the students will be able to understand and demonstrate the: • Fascia of the anterolateral abdominal wall: - Superficial fascia: fatty layer and membranous layer. - Deep (investing) fascia. - Endoabdominal fascia. • The linea alba is a strong fibrous raphe where the flat abdominal muscles decussate and interweave. • The flat abdominal muscles: - External oblique muscle. - Internal oblique muscle. - Transverse abdominis muscle. - Direction of fibers, layers, the concept of digastric muscles. • The superficial inguinal ring: formation. • Formation and attachments of the inguinal ligament. • The rectus abdominis: attachments and tendinous intersections. • Pyramidalis is a small occasional muscle. • Formation and contents of the rectus sheath. • Formation of the arcuate line. • Location of the neurovascular plane. • Arterial supply of the anterolateral abdominal wall: the anastomosis of the superior and inferior epigastric arteries. • Venous drainage of the anterolateral abdominal wall: Portal hypertension and caput medusae. • To which direction should the rectus muscle be retracted in a paramedian incision? Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Faiza Abdirisaq, Farah El-Sawy, and Muhanad Eid (Medical students). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Lever systems in the human body
 
06:47
After watching this video session, it is expected that you will be able to Define levers. Enumerate the main uses of levers Identify the three classes of levers Give mechanical examples of each class of levers Compare the mechanical advantage in the three classes of levers Give anatomical examples of each class of levers Explain why the second class lever at the ankle joint is the most suitable for its function. Discuss the fact that third class levers are the most common in the body Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar (PhD). This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation Related accounts Twitter https://twitter.com/AkramJaffar Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation SlideShare http://www.slideshare.net/AkramJaffar LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/akram-abood-jaffar-17526830 Research gate https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Akram_Jaffar Medtube https://medtube.net/users/akram-jaffar Instagram https://www.instagram.com/akramjaffar Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/akramjaffar/ Tumblr https://www.tumblr.com/blog/akramjaffar Vimeo https://vimeo.com/user9371641 Academia https://dal.academia.edu/AkramJaffar Google + https://plus.google.com/+akramjfr Tsu http://www.tsu.co/Anatomy_Education MySpace https://myspace.com/akram.jaffar
Views: 224781 Human Anatomy Education
Anatomical basis of Horner's syndrome
 
04:44
This video is part of a playlist of short videos which are intended to combine multiple choice questions' answering experience with an improved understanding of anatomy. Most of the questions are of the USMLE-type by being case-based or with clinical vignettes. However, students with little or no clinical training can answer the questions provided that they follow a clinically-oriented approach in their study of anatomy. Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation It is widely accepted that multiple choice examinations are the most objective means available today for testing the theoretical knowledge of large populations of students. They test not only an individual's knowledge but also the more subtle qualities, such as discrimination, judgment, and reasoning. If multiple choice tests are to be most effectively used as educational tools, they should be given to students during the course of studies and not just during the examination at the end of the course. Considering the descriptive nature of anatomy, and the importance of illustrations in grasping and remembering anatomical relationships, diagrams are added. However, they should not be expected to accompany questions in an actual examination setting. In this case the student should visualize these relations in his/her mind's eye before attempting to answer the question.
Triangles of the neck and thyroid gland, practical anatomy
 
20:20
This is a practical session on the anatomy of the thyroid gland and related structures including an outline of the triangles of the neck. The video session is described with the aid of plastinated specimens, plastic models and cadaveric dissection. After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to identify the: Boundaries of the triangles of the neck: anterior triangle, posterior triangle. Subdivisions of the anterior triangle: submental, submandibular, carotid and muscular. The relations of the strap muscles to the thyroid gland: sternohyoid, omohyoid, sternothyroid, and thyrohyoid. Shape and position of the thyroid lobes and isthmus. Pyramidal lobe and levator glandulae muscle. Relations of the thyroid gland to: strap muscles, trachea, esophagus, thyroid cartilage, recurrent laryngeal nerve, parathyroid glands, sympathetic trunk, carotid sheath, and pretracheal fascia The origin, course, and branches of the superior and inferior thyroid arteries. The relation of inferior thyroid artery to recurrent laryngeal nerve. Origin of the right recurrent laryngeal nerve. Location of cervical nerves in relation to scalenus anterior and medius muscles. Pretracheal and prevertebral fascia. Blocks of the neck: musculo-vertebral and respiratory-digestive . Contents of the carotid sheath and their relations: carotid vessels, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve. Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Abood Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Mr Nasser Zahra (Lab Technician) at College of Medicine, University of Sharjah. UAE. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation Related videos: Applied anatomy of the thyroid gland, presentation (1 of 3): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DmjaA-RuS8E&list=PL603240EC5A05AD9C Applied anatomy of the thyroid gland, presentation (2 of 3): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbldqXiObT8&list=PL603240EC5A05AD9C Applied anatomy of the thyroid gland, presentation (3 of 3): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KV9ymFi3M20&list=PL603240EC5A05AD9C Applied anatomy of subtotal thyroidectomy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNxLgyAlFag
Views: 259644 Human Anatomy Education
Anatomy of sympathetic nervous system - part 1
 
15:26
After watching the two parts of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to:  Explain how the sympathetic part of the autonomic nervous system and somatic nervous system differ in anatomy and function.  Describe the anatomical origin and pathways of the pre- and postganglionic sympathetic fibers.  Define visceral sensation and illustrate some models of visceral pain referral particularly cardiac referred pain.  Illustrate some examples of the function of the sympathetic nervous system: pupillary size, effect on the heart and lungs, effect on GIT. Multiple choice questions are available at the end of part-2 Check out part two http://youtu.be/yKyL_SM8sNE Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar (PhD). This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Anatomy of the light reflexes
 
03:42
After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Differentiate between direct and consensual light reflexes Describe and map the anatomical components involved in the light reflexes Explain the contralateral constriction of the pupil when a light source is projected onto one eye Compare the pathway of the light reflex to that of the accommodation reflex Identify the location where the light reflex dissociates from the accommodation reflex Explain the development of Argyll-Robertson pupil Related videos: Corneal reflex https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cldYYtejPwo Anatomy of the accommodation reflex https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BMW3vBTFLk Midbrain, simplified sections of internal structure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gQuznVG1F8 Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
What structures are supplied by the phrenic nerve?
 
03:42
This video is part of a playlist of short videos which are intended to combine multiple choice questions' answering experience with an improved understanding of anatomy. Most of the questions are of the USMLE-type by being case-based or with clinical vignettes. However, students with little or no clinical training can answer the questions provided that they follow a clinically-oriented approach in their study of anatomy. Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation It is widely accepted that multiple choice examinations are the most objective means available today for testing the theoretical knowledge of large populations of students. They test not only an individual's knowledge but also the more subtle qualities, such as discrimination, judgment, and reasoning. If multiple choice tests are to be most effectively used as educational tools, they should be given to students during the course of studies and not just during the examination at the end of the course. Considering the descriptive nature of anatomy, and the importance of illustrations in grasping and remembering anatomical relationships, diagrams are added. However, they should not be expected to accompany questions in an actual examination setting. In this case the student should visualize these relations in his/her mind's eye before attempting to answer the question.
Thoracic wall - dissection
 
11:21
This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation After watching this video, it is expected that you will be able to identify the  ribs and costal cartilages  sternum (manubrium, body, xiphoid process, jugular notch, sternal angle, sternal foramen)  arrangement of the 3 layers of intercostal muscles: external, internal, & innermost (subcostal & transverse thoracic).  direction of intercostal muscle fibers  external intercostal membrane.  position, parts, & attachments of the diaphragm  course of internal thoracic artery  intercostal neurovascular bundle (intercostal vein, artery and nerve) and collateral branch  relation of the intercostal neurovascular bundle to costal groove and rib borders.  phrenic nerve.  sympathetic trunk  thymus Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Miss Faiza Abdirisaq (Medical student) and Mr Nasser Zahra (Lab technician). The session was attended by second year MBBS students at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, 27 September 2011.
Views: 144363 Human Anatomy Education
What constitutes the borders of the mediastinal shadow in a chest x-ray?
 
02:16
This video is part of a playlist of short videos which are intended to combine multiple choice questions' answering experience with an improved understanding of anatomy. Most of the questions are of the USMLE-type by being case-based or with clinical vignettes. However, students with little or no clinical training can answer the questions provided that they follow a clinically-oriented approach in their study of anatomy. Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation It is widely accepted that multiple choice examinations are the most objective means available today for testing the theoretical knowledge of large populations of students. They test not only an individual's knowledge but also the more subtle qualities, such as discrimination, judgment, and reasoning. If multiple choice tests are to be most effectively used as educational tools, they should be given to students during the course of studies and not just during the examination at the end of the course. Considering the descriptive nature of anatomy, and the importance of illustrations in grasping and remembering anatomical relationships, diagrams are added. However, they should not be expected to accompany questions in an actual examination setting. In this case the student should visualize these relations in his/her mind's eye before attempting to answer the question.
Osteology of the skull: 3 Posterior View
 
07:06
This video is part of the playlist "Osteology of the skull": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0zwMUuDPnLjZxDkS7s4XyRb&feature=view_all . The list deals with the study of the skull bones in articulated skulls according to views (normas); in addition the playlist contains videos that describe some separate bones of the skull including: the mandible, sphenoid, ethmoid, and palatine. There is also a brief summary of the features of the newborn skull. Although each video can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the playlist is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Osteology of the skull: 1 introduction 2. Osteology of the Skull: 2 superior view 3. Osteology of the Skull: 3 posterior view 4. Osteology of the Skull: 4 lateral view 5. Osteology of the Skull: 5 inferior view 6. Osteology of the Skull: 6 cranial cavity 7. Osteology of the Skull: 7 anterior view 8. Osteology of the Skull: 8 The Mandible 9. Osteology of the Skull: 9 Sphenoid Bone 10. Osteology of the Skull: 10 Ethmoid Bone 11. Osteology of the Skull: 11 Palatine Bone 12. Osteology of the Skull: 12 The Newborn Skull Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Ahmed Thaer Zahidi (Medical student). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, April, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Osteology of the skull: 4 Lateral View
 
15:36
This video is part of the playlist "Osteology of the skull": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0zwMUuDPnLjZxDkS7s4XyRb&feature=view_all . The list deals with the study of the skull bones in articulated skulls according to views (normas); in addition the playlist contains videos that describe some separate bones of the skull including: the mandible, sphenoid, ethmoid, and palatine. There is also a brief summary of the features of the newborn skull. Although each video can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the playlist is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Osteology of the skull: 1 introduction 2. Osteology of the Skull: 2 superior view 3. Osteology of the Skull: 3 posterior view 4. Osteology of the Skull: 4 lateral view 5. Osteology of the Skull: 5 inferior view 6. Osteology of the Skull: 6 cranial cavity 7. Osteology of the Skull: 7 anterior view 8. Osteology of the Skull: 8 The Mandible 9. Osteology of the Skull: 9 Sphenoid Bone 10. Osteology of the Skull: 10 Ethmoid Bone 11. Osteology of the Skull: 11 Palatine Bone 12. Osteology of the Skull: 12 The Newborn Skull Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Ahmed Thaer Zahidi (Medical student). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, April, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Osteology of the thoracic cage: Thoracic vertebrae
 
07:56
This video is one of a series of videos dealing with "Osteology of the thoracic cage." After watching this video it is expected that you will be able to Objectives: Identify the features of the typical thoracic vertebra. Identify the atypical features of thoracic vertebrae: T1, T10, T11, & T12 Differentiate between T11 and T12 vertebrae. Although each video in the series "Osteology of the thoracic cage" can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the series is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Osteology of the sternum http://youtu.be/m1tWO3nemNU 2. Osteology of the ribs and costal cartilages http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Soj8NejXO0 3. Osteology of the thoracic vertebrae http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5Uriva_1P8 Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Nasser Zahra (lab technician). Filmed at University of Sharjah, College of Medicine. September, 2013 This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Where is the watershed area of the colon located?
 
06:52
This video is part of a playlist of short videos which are intended to combine multiple choice questions' answering experience with an improved understanding of anatomy. Most of the questions are of the USMLE-type by being case-based or with clinical vignettes. However, students with little or no clinical training can answer the questions provided that they follow a clinically-oriented approach in their study of anatomy. Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation It is widely accepted that multiple choice examinations are the most objective means available today for testing the theoretical knowledge of large populations of students. They test not only an individual's knowledge but also the more subtle qualities, such as discrimination, judgment, and reasoning. If multiple choice tests are to be most effectively used as educational tools, they should be given to students during the course of studies and not just during the examination at the end of the course. Considering the descriptive nature of anatomy, and the importance of illustrations in grasping and remembering anatomical relationships, diagrams are added. However, they should not be expected to accompany questions in an actual examination setting. In this case the student should visualize these relations in his/her mind's eye before attempting to answer the question.
Osteology of the thoracic cage: Ribs and costal cartilages
 
12:48
This video is one of a series of videos dealing with "Osteology of the thoracic cage." After watching this video it is expected that you will be able to Objectives: Identify the costal cartilages and outline their articulations (costochondral, chondrosternal and chondrochondral joints). Identify the parts of the typical rib (body, neck, head, tuberosity, articular facets, costal groove, and angle). Identify the borders and surfaces of the rib (superior and inferior border; external and internal surfaces), Explain the terms, related to ribs: Typical/atypical; true/false; fixed/floating. Recall missing and supernumerary ribs (cervical and lumbar ribs). Describe the mode of articulation of a rib with a thoracic vertebra (costovertebral and costotransverse joints). List the atypical ribs and identify the characteristic features of each: first, second, eleventh and twelfth ribs. Identify scalene tubercle on the first rib and tuberosity for serratus anterior on the second rib. Describe the relations of structures on the superior surface of the first rib. Although each video in the series "Osteology of the thoracic cage" can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the series is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Osteology of the sternum http://youtu.be/m1tWO3nemNU 2. Osteology of the ribs and costal cartilages http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Soj8NejXO0 3. Osteology of the thoracic vertebrae http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F5Uriva_1P8 Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Nasser Zahra (lab technician). Filmed at University of Sharjah, College of Medicine. September, 2013 This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Blood and nerve supply of the face - outline
 
07:35
This video is part of the playlist "Essential Anatomy for Botox Facial Injections": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0xBCGxUO3PitmIAvDbNb6Ep After watching this video it is expected that you will be able to • Outline the blood supply of the face: branches of internal and external carotid arteries. • Enumerate the motor and cutaneous nerve branches in the face. After watching the whole playlist it is expected that, in addition to the above-mentioned objectives, you will be able to: • Outline muscle groups of the face: muscles of mastication and muscles of facial expression. • Discuss the functional groups of muscles of facial expression: dilator and sphincter mechanisms of the orifices of the face. • Describe the attachment and function of the muscles of facial expression. • Summarize the structure of the upper eyelid in relation to the attachment of levator palpebrae superioris. • Discuss the anatomy of wrinkle lines in the face in relation to the muscles involved, preferred sites of injections, and possible complications: -- Horizontal lines of the forehead. -- Mephisto sign. -- Lateral brow lift. -- Glabellar lines. -- Crow's feet. -- Bunny lines. -- Marionette lines. -- Cobblestone appearance. -- Gummy smile. -- Nefertiti lift. Although each video in the list can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the playlist is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Anatomy of upper facial muscles: http://youtu.be/m4onZ7NcmTY 2. Anatomy of lower facial muscles: http://youtu.be/LWmKAV2W_Xo 3. Anatomy of wrinkle lines and Botox injection sites: http://youtu.be/WAyuAlMFD74 4. Blood and verve supply of the face -outline: For an abridged version of the playlist, check this video out: http://youtu.be/v53G4ZY1qvg Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
What is meant by left coronary dominance?
 
04:40
This video is part of a playlist of short videos which are intended to combine multiple choice questions' answering experience with an improved understanding of anatomy. Most of the questions are of the USMLE-type by being case-based or with clinical vignettes. However, students with little or no clinical training can answer the questions provided that they follow a clinically-oriented approach in their study of anatomy. Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation It is widely accepted that multiple choice examinations are the most objective means available today for testing the theoretical knowledge of large populations of students. They test not only an individual's knowledge but also the more subtle qualities, such as discrimination, judgment, and reasoning. If multiple choice tests are to be most effectively used as educational tools, they should be given to students during the course of studies and not just during the examination at the end of the course. Considering the descriptive nature of anatomy, and the importance of illustrations in grasping and remembering anatomical relationships, diagrams are added. However, should not be expected to accompany questions in an actual examination setting. In this case the student should visualize these relations in his/her mind's eye before attempting to answer the question.
Surface anatomy of the thorax
 
18:13
This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation Objectives • Locate: midclavicular line, sternal angle, trachea, clavicle, sternoclavicular joint, xiphoid process of sternum, and costal margin. • Count the ribs and intercostal spaces. • Describe the surfaces markings of the heart: borders, apex, location of the valves, auscultatory areas. • Trace the surface markings of the lung and pleura. • Trace the surface markings of the lung fissures and lobes. • Locate the position of the costodiaphragmatic and costomediastinal recesses of the pleura. Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Mr Nasser Zahra (Lab technician). The session was attended by second year students at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, 20 September 2011.
Views: 187440 Human Anatomy Education
Osteology of the Skull: 7 The Face
 
10:23
This video is part of the playlist "Osteology of the skull": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0zwMUuDPnLjZxDkS7s4XyRb&feature=view_all . The list deals with the study of the skull bones in articulated skulls according to views (normas); in addition the playlist contains videos that describe some separate bones of the skull including: the mandible, sphenoid, ethmoid, and palatine. There is also a brief summary of the features of the newborn skull. Although each video can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the playlist is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Osteology of the skull: 1 introduction 2. Osteology of the Skull: 2 superior view 3. Osteology of the Skull: 3 posterior view 4. Osteology of the Skull: 4 lateral view 5. Osteology of the Skull: 5 inferior view 6. Osteology of the Skull: 6 cranial cavity 7. Osteology of the Skull: 7 anterior view 8. Osteology of the Skull: 8 The Mandible 9. Osteology of the Skull: 9 Sphenoid Bone 10. Osteology of the Skull: 10 Ethmoid Bone 11. Osteology of the Skull: 11 Palatine Bone 12. Osteology of the Skull: 12 The Newborn Skull Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Ahmed Thaer Zahidi (Medical student). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, April, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Osteology of the skull: 1 Introduction
 
07:12
Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Ahmed Thaer Zahidi (Medical student). Filmed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, April, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation This video is part of the playlist "Osteology of the skull": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0zwMUuDPnLjZxDkS7s4XyRb&feature=view_all . The list deals with the study of the skull bones in articulated skulls according to views (normas); in addition the playlist contains videos that describe some separate bones of the skull including: the mandible, sphenoid, ethmoid, and palatine. There is also a brief summary of the features of the newborn skull. Although each video can be watched separately, but it is recommended that the playlist is watched in the following sequence of videos: 1. Osteology of the skull: 1 introduction 2. Osteology of the Skull: 2 superior view 3. Osteology of the Skull: 3 posterior view 4. Osteology of the Skull: 4 lateral view 5. Osteology of the Skull: 5 inferior view 6. Osteology of the Skull: 6 cranial cavity 7. Osteology of the Skull: 7 anterior view 8. Osteology of the Skull: 8 The Mandible 9. Osteology of the Skull: 9 Sphenoid Bone 10. Osteology of the Skull: 10 Ethmoid Bone 11. Osteology of the Skull: 11 Palatine Bone 12. Osteology of the Skull: 12 The Newborn Skull
Relations at the superior mediastinum, simplified sketches
 
17:20
After completion of this video session, it is expected that you will be able to: Arrange the structures located in the superior mediastinum in a simplified sketch so that the structures appear in sequential layers from posterior to anterior. A corresponding horizontal section at the lower border of T2 vertebra is also used to draw the same structures simultaneously on the section. Describe the relations of the arch of aorta and its branches, location of the ligamentum arteriosum, superior vena cava and tributaries (right and left brachiocephalic veins), azygos arch in relation to the right lung root, thoracic duct, phrenic and vagus nerves (left recurrent laryngeal nerve), pulmonary trunk and its branches, left superior intercostal vein, trachea, tracheobronchial lymph nodes, cardia, pulmonary, and esophageal plexuses, esophagus, and thymus. Related video: Superior mediastinum, dissection http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xOQt7RhbdU Presented and edited by Dr. Akram Jaffar (PhD). This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" Page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Applied anatomy of appendectomy
 
09:03
This video is intended to highlight anatomical structures of surgical significance during appendectomy. The surgery was performed by Dr.Mohammed Hasan, filmed by Dr.Thayer M Al-Jumaily at Kadhimiya Teaching Hospital (Baghdad, Iraq), edited and subtitled for teaching purposes by Dr.Akram Jaffar. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Dissection of the liver
 
07:34
Objectives: After watching this video it is expected that you will be able to • Describe and identify gross anatomy of the liver: porta hepatis; peritoneal relations: lesser omentum, falciform ligament, coronary and triangular ligaments. Bare area of the liver; relations of the visceral surface of the liver. • Discuss the factors that maintain the liver in its position. • Describe the location and relations of the epiploic foramen. Related video: gross anatomy of the liver http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mU5aZnNl1Q&feature=share Presented and edited by Dr.Akram Jaffar (PhD). Filmed by Mr. Nasser Zahra (lab technician). Dissection performed at College of Medicine/ University of Sharjah, 2012. This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
Blood supply of the heart
 
13:57
This video and its channel are supported by "Human Anatomy Education" page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation After watching this video it is expected that you will be able to: • Identify the origin of right and left coronary arteries from aortic sinuses. • Identify and describe the course of the right coronary artery and its common branches: - SA nodal artery. - Acute marginal artery - Posterior interventricular artery - Atrial and ventricular branches. - AV nodal artery • Relate the clinical nomenclature of coronary arteries to the anatomical terms. • Map the area of supply of the right coronary artery • Identify and describe the course of the left coronary artery and its main branches: - Anterior interventricular artery. - Circumflex artery. • Enumerate the branches of anterior interventricular and circumflex arteries. • Map the area of supply of the left coronary artery • Identify the sites of anastomosis of coronary arteries. • Explain the dominance of coronary circulation. • Outline the blood supply of the conducting system of the heart. • Describe the blood supply of the interventricular septum. • Outline the veins on the surface of the heart and relate them to the accompanying coronary arteries. • Describe the location, formation and opening of the coronary sinus. • Identify the tributaries of the coronary sinus. • Identify the oblique vein of the left atrium. • Enumerate and locate veins draining the myocardium other than the coronary sinus: smallest cardiac veins and anterior cardiac veins. Presented and by Dr. Akram Jaffar.
Views: 153467 Human Anatomy Education

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