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Search results “Chosen plaintext attack in cryptography for dummies” for the 2013
Secure Signatures and Chosen Ciphertext Security in a Qu ...
 
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Talk at crypto 2013. Authors: Dan Boneh, Mark Zhandry
Views: 348 TheIACR
Short Key Cryptography
 
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Ciphertexts produced by any short key ciphers do commit to the single plaintext that generated them. No equivocation. This commitment is the basis for brute-force cryptanalysis, and also the basis for probability-modified, much more efficient, cryptanalysis. It condemns today's master ciphers (e.g. AES) to sustain ongoing erosion of their efficacy.
Views: 499 Gideon Samid
Linear Algebra Application: The Hill Cipher
 
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This is an introduction of the application of linear algebra in cryptography: the Hill Cipher. The basic encryption and decryption methods are introduced. Also, one kind of the cipher attacks, the known plaintext attack, is also included.
Views: 12170 Patricia Gong
Cryptography: Transposition Cipher
 
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This lesson explains how to encrypt and decrypt a message using a transposition cipher. Site: http://mathispower4u.com
Views: 55387 Mathispower4u
04 XOR Cipher  Plaintext and Ciphertext
 
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(4 of 4) Work-through tutorial on creating a cipher system in Excel 2010 using binary XOR.
Views: 7432 Rodborough ICT
Hundreds Cipher Solutions, Secret Power, Endless Mode
 
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MAJOR SPOILERS BELOW - PROCEED WITH CAUTION App store link: http://bit.ly/17a8vMM [+] $4.99 Message 1 (Level 3) Riddle: A MOUSE HAS ONE SNOUT BUT A HAND HAS FIVE Solution: Touch the screen with five fingers. Message 2 (Level 11) Riddle: EERNSITCEPS OTHIWTU EIAPTECN SI A OGLDNE RHPA ISIMGNS SIT HCDRO Solution: PERSISTENCE WITHOUT PATIENCE IS A GOLDEN HARP MISSING ITS CHORD Method: This is an anagram sentence. The letters of each word are rearranged. Rearrange the letters of each word. As the solved message tells you, you have to be persistent to solve it. The first time, letters will jump around while you try to rearrange them - the second time, they will be far more cooperative. Message 3 (Level 24) Riddle: XK BOOLO XQ QEB CRKZQFLK ZFMEBOPZOBBK IFKB QBK BUMBZQBA PBJFZLILK Solution: AN ERROR AT THE FUNCTION CIPHERSCREEN LINE TEN EXPECTED SEMICOLON Method: This is a Caesar cipher. When tapping any letter, a wheel will appear where you can rotate through the alphabet. Substitute each letter with the letter 3 letters down the alphabet. So 'A' = 'D', 'B' = 'E', 'X' = 'A' (wrap around), et cetera. Message 4 (Level 31) Riddle: HHERAIRHHNOEAGRLHOSLARUOOLCWRACOLUERAGSLUHSDGTO Solution: HAHAHA OR LAUGHING OR LAUGHTER OR SUCCESS OR HELLO WORLD Method: This is a rotation cyper. It is decoded by writing the message into a table with 4 columns and then reading it from top to bottom and from left to right. Message 5 (Level 45) Riddle: WECT RM NDQSFSTDLOD CLR C BMJRDL ECQN ECVD FL OMKKML Solution: WHAT DO PERSISTENCE AND A GOLDEN HARP HAVE IN COMMON Method: This is a substitution cipher. Every plaintext letter is assigned to a unique ciphertext letter. The cipher was created by the word 'CHORD' and then filling up the rest with the letters in alphabetic order - Plaintext: ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ, Ciphertext: CHORDABEFGIJKLMNPQSTUVWXYZ Message 6 (Level 59) Riddle: SELVAHRRWWZSSAGZCVULHBBSKNRJIVPCDZYKRBRCN Solution: BEING PART OF A BAD RIDDLE THAT NOBODY CARES ABOUT Method: This is a Vigenère Cipher. It's basically a Caesar cipher where the shift of each letter is determined by a key which is repeated for the entire length of the plaintext. Looking at the icons for solving the other messages I tried a few words and found RADIUS to be the key (look at the icon for deciphering message 5). Now, to decipher this message we write the ciphertext and the repeated key underneath: SELVAHRRWWZSSAGZCVULHBBSKNRJIVPCDZYKRBRCN RADIUSRADIUSRADIUSRADIUSRADIUSRADIUSRADIU The first letter of the ciphertext is 'S' and the corresponding key letter is 'R' which means that the caesar cipher mapped 'A' to 'R' - so 'S' becomes 'B'. The second ciphertext letter 'E' remains unchanged because the key letter 'A' signifies that the caesar cipher used the shift 0. The third letter of the ciphertext is 'L' and the key letter is 'D' so 'L' becomes 'I'. Continue this method for the rest of the message. Message 7 (Level 62) Riddle: http://i.imgur.com/AuYDY.png Solution: YOU SHOULD BE THANKING ME FOR OVERWRITING THREE THROUGH NINE Method: Yet another substitution cipher - but this time with symbols for the ciphertext. More information to come. Message 8 (Level 76) Riddle: http://i.imgur.com/wRYBP.png Solution I SAVED YOU FROM ALL OF THEIR METAPHORS AND HINTS Method: This is a pigpen cipher. More information to come. Message 9 (Level 85) Riddle: http://i.imgur.com/WdGIZ.png Solution: YOU WERE NOT GOING TO UNLOCK THE SECRET POWER ANYWAY Method: One first realizes that these are the same glyphs as in message 7. Using this cipher results in: YKU WONO JKQ AKDJA QK UJHKCG QBO POCNOQ LKWON SJYWSY It is then necessary to once again crack a substitution cipher. The incomplete but sufficient cipher is - Plaintext: ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ, Ciphertext: GHCI__KL_NOP_REST_A_U_W_Y_ Message 10 (Level 93) Riddle: http://i.imgur.com/MkH2t.png Solution: THREE ONE FOUR ONE FIVE NINE TWO SIX FIVE THREE Method: Looking at the pattern (first and last word identical, three letter word repeated) and combining with the fact that the glyphs are all made up of circles one might get to the digits of Pi. To Unlock The Secret Power: In the round selection screen, tap the levels in the order specified by message 10: three, one, four, one, five, nine, two, six, five, three. A sound will play and in the upper left corner a magnet icon will appear that you can toggle on and off. Activating this secret power allows you to tap anywhere on the field to generate a pulling force that will move the surrounding circles. Majority of cipher solutions credit to kamikaze2842 http://www.youtube.com/user/kamikaze2842 ... · · Thanks for watching! ▴ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/GameMobSub ▴ Game Mob: http://bit.ly/GameMob ▴ Reviews: http://bit.ly/MobReviews ▴ Twitter: http://bit.ly/AlexonTwitter ▴ Facebook: http://bit.ly/AlexonFB ▴ Recording Gear: http://bit.ly/RecEquip
Views: 5517 mcqueeb
Plaintext-vs-Encrypted Passwords Learning Byte
 
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This Learning Byte is appropriate for new users of the Junos Operating System to assist them in understanding the differences between using plain-text and encrypted passwords when configuring login parameters. There is a short lecture followed by a demonstration that covers when and why you should choose to use each configuration method as well as how not to use the encrypted password method. Presenter: William Pincek, Education Services Engineer Relevant to Junos OS Releases:: All Junos Releases Relevant to Juniper Platforms:: All Junos-based Platforms
Views: 1253 JuniperNetworks
Neural Cryptography
 
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http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/NeuralCryptography The Wolfram Demonstrations Project contains thousands of free interactive visualizations, with new entries added daily. This Demonstration shows how a neural-network key exchange protocol for encrypted communication works using the Hebbian learning rule. The idea is: the person A wants to communicate with the person B, but they cannot exchange a key through a secure chan... Contributed by: Hector Sanchez Audio created with WolframTones: http://tones.wolfram.com
Views: 572 wolframmathematica
Asymmetry -- The Cryptographic Game Changer
 
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The most impactful innovation in cryptography in the last half century is the notion of asymmetry: using different keys for encryption and decryption, and finding the mathematics that would make it difficult (so we assume) for our adversary to derive one key from the other. The essence of this game changing innovation is described in this video.
Views: 1268 Gideon Samid
DES Design and Meet-in-the-Middle Attack on Double DES (CSS322, Lecture 6, 2013)
 
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DES design issues, avalanche effect, double DES and meet-in-the-middle attack. Lecture 6 of CSS322 Security and Cryptography at Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology, Thammasat University. Given on 28 November 2013 at Bangkadi, Pathumthani, Thailand by Steven Gordon. Course material via: http://sandilands.info/sgordon/teaching
Views: 5995 Steven Gordon
Towards Secure Multi-Keyword Top-k Retrieval over Encrypted Cloud Data
 
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To get this project in ONLINE or through TRAINING Sessions, Contact: JP INFOTECH, 45, KAMARAJ SALAI, THATTANCHAVADY, PUDUCHERRY-9 Landmark: Opposite to Thattanchavady Industrial Estate, Next to VVP Nagar Arch. Mobile: (0) 9952649690 , Email: [email protected], web: www.jpinfotech.org Blog: www.jpinfotech.blogspot.com Towards Secure Multi-Keyword Top-k Retrieval over Encrypted Cloud Data Cloud computing has emerging as a promising pattern for data outsourcing and high quality data services. However, concerns of sensitive information on cloud potentially cause privacy problems. Data encryption protects data security to some extent, but at the cost of compromised efficiency. Searchable symmetric encryption (SSE) allows retrieval of encrypted data over cloud. In this paper, we focus on addressing data privacy issues using searchable symmetric encryption (SSE). For the first time, we formulate the privacy issue from the aspect of similarity relevance and scheme robustness. We observe that server-side ranking based on order-preserving encryption (OPE) inevitably leaks data privacy. To eliminate the leakage, we propose a two-round searchable encryption (TRSE) scheme that supports top-k multi-keyword retrieval. In TRSE, we employ a vector space model and homomorphic encryption. The vector space model helps to provide sufficient search accuracy, and the homomorphic encryption enables users to involve in the ranking while the majority of computing work is done on the server side by operations only on ciphertext. As a result, information leakage can be eliminated and data security is ensured. Thorough security and performance analysis show that the proposed scheme guarantees high security and practical efficiency.
Views: 1287 jpinfotechprojects
Types of attacks
 
04:05
Views: 33 Edric Lian
Black Hat EU 2013 - A Perfect CRIME? Only TIME Will Tell
 
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By: Tal Be'ery & Amichai Shulman On 2012, security researchers shook the world of security with their CRIME attack against the SSL encryption protocol. CRIME (Compression Ratio Info-leak Made Easy) attack used an inherent information leakage vulnerability resulting from the HTTP compression usage to defeat SSL's encryption. However, the CRIME attack had two major practical drawbacks. The first is the attack threat model: CRIME attacker is required to control the plaintext AND to be able to intercept the encrypted message. This attack model limits the attack to mostly MITM (Man In The Middle) situation. The second issue is the CRIME attack was solely aimed at HTTP requests. However, most of the current web does not compress HTTP requests. The few protocols that did support HTTP requests compression (SSL compression and SPDY) had dropped their support following the attack details disclosure, by thus rendering the CRIME attack irrelevant. In our work we address these two limitations by introducing the TIME (Timing Info-leak Made Easy) attack for HTTP responses. By using timing information differential analysis to infer on the compressed payload's size, the CRIME attack's attack model can be simplified and its requirements can be loosened. In TIME's attack model the attacker only needs to control the plaintext, theoretically allowing any malicious site to launch a TIME attack against its innocent visitors, to break SSL encryption and/or Same Origin Policy (SOP). Changing the target of the attack from HTTP requests to HTTP responses significantly increases the attack surface, as most of the current web utilizes HTTP response compression to save bandwidth and latency. In particular, we: Introduce the TIME attack Show an actual POC of timing differential analysis to infer on the compressed payload's size and subsequently the cipher-text's underlying plaintext Show the relevancy of compression ratio information leakage for HTTP responses Suggest mitigation steps against the TIME attack
Views: 1115 Black Hat
Pest6a Brute Force Caesar Cipher
 
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Learn how to cycle through every possible key to decrypt a message without actually knowing the key
Views: 1759 Joe McCarthy-Holland
Birthday Attack!
 
02:46
Views: 445 TheEnglishbloke71
Black Hat USA 2013 - TLS 'secrets'
 
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By: Florent 'NextGen$' Daigniere SSL and TLS have become the de-facto standards for transport-layer encryption. In recent years, many vulnerabilities have been uncovered in both the standards, their implementation and the way people configure and use them. This talk is exploring in details a lesser-known and much less talked about part of the standard which breaks some of the security properties one would expect. A tool allowing for forensic recovery of plaintext (even when PFS ciphers are in use) will be released.
Views: 941 Black Hat
Security Snippets: Blowfish with CBC
 
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The tutorial is at: http://www.asecuritysite.com/Encryption/blowfishcbc
Views: 332 Bill Buchanan OBE
Vulnerabilities of Android Cryptographic Applications
 
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The report covers the most well-known mobile applications for Android (with the focus on the USA market), which deal with user information — text encoders, user credentials storages, messengers. The results of the performed research show that none of the considered applications complies with the stated characteristics. They include both indirect and direct security threats, which allow accessing confidential data.
Multiplicative Inverse
 
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Multiplicative Inverse
Views: 80 stannesrhund
How NOT to Store Passwords! - Computerphile
 
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Security of users' passwords should be at the forefront of every web developer's mind. Tom takes us through the insecure ways in which some websites deal with passwords. Note: At circa 8mins, the animation does not show how the 'salt' is also stored in the database alongside the username. Hashing Algorithms and Security: http://youtu.be/b4b8ktEV4Bg Security of Data on Disk: http://youtu.be/4SSSMi4X_mA More from Tom Scott: http://www.youtube.com/user/enyay and https://twitter.com/tomscott http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. See the full list of Brady's video projects at: http://bit.ly/bradychannels
Views: 1470945 Computerphile
Cryptanalysis Challenge(DIFFICULT)
 
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Cipher text below: Instructions: You have been given a cipher text. Try to decipher the message! If you need a hint, message me. Cipher text below:   Note: If you see squares or question marks, that is normal.
Views: 134 Robert Grime
Black Hat USA 2013 - Big Data for Web Application Security
 
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By: Mike Arpaia & Kyle Barry The security posture of an application is directly proportional to the amount of information that is known about the application. Although the advantages of analytics from a data science perspective are well known and well documented, the advantages of analytics from a web application security perspective are neither well known nor well documented. How can we, as web application security practitioners, take advantage of big data stacks to improve the security posture of our applications? This talk will dive into the ways that big data analytics can be taken advantage of to create effective defenses for web applications today. We'll outline the fundamental problems that can and should be solved with big data and outline the classes of security mechanisms that simply, based on their nature, cannot be solved with big data. Once an understanding of the domain is established, we'll explore several specific examples that outline how one security team uses big data every day to solve hard, interesting problems and create a safer experience for its users.
Views: 164 Black Hat
Cryptography is a systems problem (or) 'Should we deploy TLS'
 
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Cryptography is a systems problem (or) 'Should we deploy TLS' Given by Matthew Green, Johns Hopkins University
Views: 5688 Dartmouth
Identity-Based Secure Distributed Data Storage Schemes
 
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To get this project in ONLINE or through TRAINING Sessions, Contact: JP INFOTECH, 45, KAMARAJ SALAI, THATTANCHAVADY, PUDUCHERRY-9 Landmark: Opposite to Thattanchavady Industrial Estate, Next to VVP Nagar Arch. Mobile: (0) 9952649690 , Email: [email protected], web: www.jpinfotech.org Blog: www.jpinfotech.blogspot.com Identity-Based Secure Distributed Data Storage Schemes Secure distributed data storage can shift the burden of maintaining a large number of files from the owner to proxy servers. Proxy servers can convert encrypted files for the owner to encrypted files for the receiver without the necessity of knowing the content of the original files. In practice, the original files will be removed by the owner for the sake of space efficiency. Hence, the issues on confidentiality and integrity of the outsourced data must be addressed carefully. In this paper, we propose two identity-based secure distributed data storage (IBSDDS) schemes. Our schemes can capture the following properties: (1) The file owner can decide the access permission independently without the help of the private key generator (PKG); (2) For one query, a receiver can only access one file, instead of all files of the owner; (3) Our schemes are secure against the collusion attacks, namely even if the receiver can compromise the proxy servers, he cannot obtain the owner's secret key. Although the first scheme is only secure against the chosen plaintext attacks (CPA), the second scheme is secure against the chosen cipher text attacks (CCA). To the best of our knowledge, it is the first IBSDDS schemes where an access permissions is made by the owner for an exact file and collusion attacks can be protected in the standard model.
Views: 1207 jpinfotechprojects
Ruby Conf 2013 - Being Boring: A Survival Guide to Ruby Cryptography
 
27:18
We all know that security is hard, and that math is hard, but what happens when you put them together? Cryptography is an increasingly essential tool for building secure systems, but also a perilous minefield where any number of mistakes can lead to insecure systems. This talk will take you step-by-step through the difficulties of building secure cryptosystems on top of Ruby's existing OpenSSL bindings and contrast that with RbNaCl, a next generation Ruby cryptography library specifically designed to be more mistake-proof and put cryptography "on Rails". Attendees will hopefully learn that the best approaches to cryptography rest in making systems simple, straightforward, and boring... in a good way. Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/FG4Y/
Views: 1845 Confreaks
Fast SHA1 hash cracking with rainbow tables and RainbowCrack for GPU
 
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1. Crack 95 characters per position, length 8 plaintext in 12 minutes 2. Test 10,000,000 million plaintexts per second 3. Based on time memory tradeoff algorithm and NVIDIA CUDA technology (with GeForce GTX 680 GPU)
Views: 17930 RainbowCrack Project
HOPE Number Six (2006): Constructing Cryptographic Protocols
 
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Saturday, July 22, 2006: 7:00 pm (Area "B"): This lecture will show how to construct advanced cryptographic protocols. Beginning with a set of requirements for a communications protocol that includes immunity from replay attacks, traffic analysis resistance, and resiliency against partial compromise, the audience will be shown how a naive protocol can be iteratively improved into a protocol satisfying those requirements. Hosted by J. Salvatore Testa II
Views: 101 Channel2600
Practical Multilinear Maps over the Integers
 
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Talk at crypto 2013. Authors: Jean-Sébastien Coron, Tancrède Lepoint, Mehdi Tibouchi
Views: 794 TheIACR
CISSP Cramslide on IPSec
 
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CISSP Study Notes in Slideshow format, powered by http://technology.examreview.net.
Multi-Party Computation: From Theory to Practice
 
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Google Tech Talk 1/8/13 Presented by Nigel P. Smart ABSTRACT Multi-Party Computation (MPC) allows, in theory, a set of parties to compute any function on their secret input without revealing anything bar the output of the function. For many years this has been a restricted to a theoretical tool in cryptography. However, in the past five years amazing strides have been made in turning theory into practice. In this talk I will present the latest, practical, protocol called SPDZ (Speedz), which achieves much of its performance advantage from the use of Fully Homomorphic Encryption as a sub-procedure. No prior knowledge of MPC will be assumed. Speaker Info University of Bristol, U.K.
Views: 8838 GoogleTechTalks
Identity-Based Secure Distributed Data Storage Schemes
 
01:14
To get this project in ONLINE or through TRAINING Sessions, Contact: JP INFOTECH, 45, KAMARAJ SALAI, THATTANCHAVADY, PUDUCHERRY-9 Landmark: Opposite to Thattanchavady Industrial Estate, Next to VVP Nagar Arch. Mobile: (0) 9952649690 , Email: [email protected], web: www.jpinfotech.org Blog: www.jpinfotech.blogspot.com Our Branches in: Coimbatore | Salem | Bangalore | Mysore | Tanjore | Cuddalore | Villupuram | Chennai Identity-Based Secure Distributed Data Storage Schemes Secure distributed data storage can shift the burden of maintaining a large number of files from the owner to proxy servers. Proxy servers can convert encrypted files for the owner to encrypted files for the receiver without the necessity of knowing the content of the original files. In practice, the original files will be removed by the owner for the sake of space efficiency. Hence, the issues on confidentiality and integrity of the outsourced data must be addressed carefully. In this paper, we propose two identity-based secure distributed data storage (IBSDDS) schemes. Our schemes can capture the following properties: (1) The file owner can decide the access permission independently without the help of the private key generator (PKG); (2) For one query, a receiver can only access one file, instead of all files of the owner; (3) Our schemes are secure against the collusion attacks, namely even if the receiver can compromise the proxy servers, he cannot obtain the owner's secret key. Although the first scheme is only secure against the chosen plaintext attacks (CPA), the second scheme is secure against the chosen cipher text attacks (CCA). To the best of our knowledge, it is the first IBSDDS schemes where an access permissions is made by the owner for an exact file and collusion attacks can be protected in the standard model.
Views: 382 jpinfotechprojects
A Secure Code Based Cloud Storage System using Proxy Re-Encryption Scheme in Cloud Computing
 
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The objective of this project is to securely transmit the data from the sender to the receiver through the cloud storage servers.
How to encrypt text files using Notepad++
 
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How to encrypt text files using Notepad++ http://prothoughts.com/encrypt-using-notepad/
Views: 703 ProThoughts.com
Basic computer security
 
29:47
Computer security is a big, but Keeping safe is not that hard. Major security attacks: -------------------------------- 1. Password Attacks • Dictionary Attack 2. Phishing Attacks 3. Malware Attacks • Trojan • Vulnerability Safety : ---------- 1. Password attack -Don't use a bad password for an important site (e.g. bank) -Don't re-use passwords across important sites 2. Phishing Attack -Proceed carefully with content from email, or with provocative titles -Look at the browser url-area when typing in password -Or just type in website yourself in the browser instead of clicking in the email 3. Malware Attack -Trojan - be very wary of downloading and running code (google the name or source) -Vulnerability case - keep internet-facing software on auto-update to stay at the latest Document: http://www.stanford.edu/class/cs101/security-1.html
Views: 108 ygscdr
DEF CON 21 - Melissa Elliott - Noise Floor Exploring Unintentional Radio Emissions
 
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Noise Floor: Exploring the world of unintentional radio emissions by Melissa Elliott Application security researcher, Veracode If it's electronic, it makes noise. Not necessarily noise that you and I can hear, of course -- unless you know how to tune in. The air around us is filled with bloops, bleeps, and bzzts of machines going about their business, betraying their existence through walls or even from across the street. The unintentional noise lurking among intentional signals can even reveal what the machine is currently doing when it thinks it's keeping that information to itself. Attacks exploiting electromagnetic radiation, such as TEMPEST, have long been known, but government-sized budgets are no longer needed to procure the radio equipment. USB television receiver dongles can be used as software-defined radios (SDR) that cost less than a slice of Raspberry Pi. The goal of this talk is to show you that anyone with twenty bucks and some curiosity can learn a great deal about your computers and other equipment without ever leaving a trace, and you shouldn't neglect this risk when managing your organization's security. Melissa Elliott (better known as 0xabad1dea) is a professional security bug finder who has seen unspeakable horrors in corporate codebases from around the world. Her very name causes systems to crash, especially ones that use jQuery. Her hobbies include programming the Nintendo Entertainment System, criticizing other people's C code, and an interest in radio emissions that resulted from a trip to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, West Virginia. Materials: http://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-21/dc-21-presentations/Elliott/DEFCON-21-Elliott-noisefloor-URLS-reference.txt
Views: 54039 DEFCONConference
123 Affine Transformations vs  Linear Transformations
 
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Jamie King flying the ship some more and also discussing how affine transformations are (not really just) linear tranformations followed by translation.
Views: 1507 Jamie King
Cryptographie - partie 1 : chiffrement de César
 
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Chapitre "Cryptographie" - Partie 1 : Le chiffrement de César Plan : César a dit... ; Des chiffres et des lettres ; Modulo ; Chiffrer et déchiffrer ; Espace des clés et attaque ; Algorithmes Exo7. Cours et exercices de mathématiques pour les étudiants. Retrouvez le polycopié sur http://exo7.emath.fr
Views: 118538 Exo7Math
DEF CON 21 - Tom Ritter - De Anonymizing Alt Anonymous Messages
 
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De-Anonymizing Alt.Anonymous.Messages TOM RITTER In recent years, new encryption programs like Tor, RedPhone, TextSecure, Cryptocat, and others have taken the spotlight - but the old guard of remailers and shared inboxes are still around. Alt.Anonymous.Messages is a stream of thousands of anonymous, encrypted messages, seemingly opaque to investigators. For the truly paranoid, there is no communication system that has better anonymity - providing features and resisting traffic analysis in ways that Tor does not. Or so is believed. After collecting as many back messages as possible and archiving new postings daily for four years, several types of analysis on the contents of alt.anonymous.messages will be presented and several ways to break sender and receiver anonymity explained. Messages will be directly and statistically correlated, communication graphs drawn, and we'll talk about what challenges the next generation of remailers and nymservs face, and how they should be designed. Tom Ritter is interested in nearly all aspects of cryptography, privacy, anonymity, and pseudonymity. He contributes to http://crypto.is and tries to explain the difference between Onion Routing and Mixing to as many people as he can. He is located corporeally in New York City, virtually at http://ritter.vg, and meta-physically has been lost for quite some time. Materials: https://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-21/dc-21-presentations/Ritter/DEFCON-21-Ritter-De-Anonymizing-Alt.Anonymous-Messages-Updated.pdf https://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-21/dc-21-presentations/Ritter/DEFCON-21-Ritter-De-Anonymizing-
Views: 2516 DEFCONConference
DEF CON 21 - Daniel Selifonov - A Password is Not Enough
 
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A Password is Not Enough: Why disk encryption is broken and how we might fix it DANIEL SELIFONOV Since the publication of the cold boot attack on software disk encryption 5 years ago, there has been little progress on developing countermeasures and implementing defenses in the disk encryption technologies already in wide use. Furthermore, many users of full disk encryption have physical security habits that fall outside the security models of disk encryption software and thus are more vulnerable than they realize. After examining a set of effective, easily executable, attacks on off- the-shelf disk encryption, and contextualizing them in x86 system architecture, we examine recent research on means of mitigating these attacks. By integrating AES new instructions, x86 debugging registers, encrypted RAM, IOMMU, and the TPM into a combined encryption system, the difficulty of executing a successful attack is raised significantly. We will examine the construction of this system in detail, and, at a higher level, the role of full disk encryption in assuring meaningful security in the face of physical access. Source to an experimental version of the system will be made available. Daniel Selifonov has consulted for a handful of research oriented startups since 2007, and built systems for information technology where security was considered throughout design and implementation, rather than as an afterthought. His research interests in security include reverse engineering, applied cryptography, client side security, and user acceptable information system design. He believes that businesses, no matter the size, should have the tools to defend themselves without getting in the way of core operations, and that existing tools and building blocks require too much expert input to implement correctly. Github: https://github.com/thyth/ Personal Website : http://thyth.com/ Materials: https://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-21/dc-21-presentations/Selifonov/DEFCON-21-Selifonov-A-Password-is-Not-Enough-Why-Disk-Encryption-is-Broken.pdf
Views: 1698 DEFCONConference

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