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EARLY DAYS - COAL MINE
 
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EARLY DAYS - COAL MINE
Views: 3380 frank arrowsmith
A Hidden America: Coal Mining
 
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Section of 20/20 Documentary. I do not own the rights to this video.
Views: 36907 Damien Dickman
The Unheard Story Of Appalachia's Coal, Part 1
 
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Eastern Kentucky and most of Appalachia had a thriving coal industry for more than 100 years. We went to coal country to talk to people about just how important coal has been to the region and how much Appalachia has changed with its decline. Part 2: https://youtu.be/UJxCqHoUAT8 Part 3: https://youtu.be/hYEEBpHJMAQ Additional archival photos provided by the SKCTC Appalachian Archives, from their U.S. Coal & Coke, International Harvester, Ewell Balltrip and Kentucky Coal Museum Photo Collections. Subscribe for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV3Nm3T-XAgVhKH9jT0ViRg?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish Download the AJ+ app at http://www.ajplus.net/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajplus
Views: 26672 AJ+
Harlan County, USA
 
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Harlan County, USA is a 1976 Oscar-winning documentary film covering the "Brookside Strike", an effort of 180 coal miners and their wives against the Duke Power Company-owned Eastover Coal Company's Brookside Mine and Prep Plant in Harlan County, southeast Kentucky in 1973.[2] Directed and produced by Barbara Kopple, who has long been an advocate of workers' rights, Harlan County, U.S.A. is less ambivalent in its attitude toward unions than her later American Dream, the account of the Hormel Foods strike in Austin, Minnesota in 1985-86. Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - documentaries
Views: 14197 Karl Hungus
Sago Mine Disaster
 
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Thirteen men sat in the best barricade they could build, enduring...hoping. They had used their single hour of oxygen from the only Self Contained Self Rescuer issued to them by the company. Their families waited outside living through one of the most difficult times of their lives, praying to see their loved ones once again. As time wore on, we would learn the ultimate fate of those men, those husbands, those fathers, those grandfathers, brothers, uncles, nephews. One was alive, barely holding on…the others had perished in the thick poisoned air of the mine. The miners of Sago were like so many of us. They took one of the few jobs available to them, jobs that would allow them to live in the places they had long called home, jobs that would pay enough to support their families. If only the company had given them more than one SCSR—if only there had been a law—but we know how much power money holds over the hearts of men. It would be the suffering and tragic loss of life of those 12 brave souls—the pain of constant loss felt by their families—that would finally see to it that every coal miner in the United States would never face the same crisis. Millions of Americans became outraged at the events that played out on their televisions, and the ensuing public outcry would accomplish a feat that has seldom been accomplished in the history of US coal mining—the power of coal industry lobbyists was outweighed by the voice of the public in the halls of government. Laws were passed and now additional SCSRs must be purchased by coal companies, underground safe havens must be built and supply miners with three day of oxygen, food, and water. Each time my crew passed a safe haven and SCSR stash on our way to the section, I would think of those men, I would think of their final hours. I would pay my respects to them in my own way and wish that the corruption of the coalfields had not taken their lives. I hope that other miners do the same and remember the day the miners of Sago perished and the hearts of their families were forever broken. May you all rest in peace. God Bless.
Views: 136631 Nick Mullins
American Coal Mining Documentary - Strip Mines - Appalachian Mountains - 1974
 
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FOR OVER 25 YEARS COAL COMPANIES HAVE STRIP MINED THOUSAND OF ACRES OF AMERICAN APPALCHIAN MOUNTAINS. THOUSAND OF ACRES OF COUNTRY ARE LAID WASTE AS WHOLE MOUNTAINSIDE ARE BLASTED AND BULLDOZED TO REACH OFTEN TINY COAL SEAMS. ONE OF THE BIGGEST LAND OWNERS IN THE AREA IS THE BRITISH COMPANY "AMERICAN ASSOCIATION LTD" WHICH FORMS PART OF AN INTERNATIONAL EMPIRE HEADED BY AN EX LORD MAYOR OF LONDON, SIR DENYS LOWSON. First Shown: 25/07/1974 If you would like to license a clip from this video please e mail: [email protected] Quote: VT9724
Views: 10505 ThamesTv
"Reflections" Mining History
 
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Mine Safety and Health Administration "Reflections" Mining History DVD509 - 2002 Shows the evolution of health and safety laws and the role of the supervisor.
Views: 24576 PublicResourceOrg
Highlights of Coal Miners - History of Underground Miners and Families
 
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Coal (from the Old English term col, which has meant "mineral of fossilized carbon" since the 13th century)is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring in rock strata in layers or veins called coal beds or coal seams. Coal is extracted from the ground by coal mining, either underground by shaft mining, or at ground level by open pit mining extraction. Since 1983 the world top coal producer has been China. Coal is the largest source of energy for the generation of electricity worldwide, as well as one of the largest worldwide anthropogenic sources of carbon dioxide releases. There were no Bucket Wheel Excavators back then!
Views: 652 Jester BumbleBee
The trade union history of coal in the USA
 
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Coal mining in the Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountaintop_removal_mining
Views: 127 visionontv
A Brief History of Coal Mining
 
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We briefly explain the history of coal. From the cave man days, to present day. For more information on coal, and the debate of whether it is a logical energy source please visit: http://www.advantagesanddisadvantagesofcoal.com/
Views: 6218 coaldebate
Racial and Ethnic Boundaries in the Coal Mines
 
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To meet the growing demand for coal in the early 20th century, West Virginia companies needed more miners. African Americans mixed with European immigrants and native Appalachians in the mines and the coal towns. Coal operators felt that diversity would keep unionization at bay. "The Mine Wars" premieres on American Experience PBS January 26, 2015.
Views: 2828 AmericanExperiencePBS
A History of Coal's Extraordinary Impact on Human Civilization (2003)
 
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The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States "colliery" has historically been used to describe a coal mine operation, but the word today is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, jacks and shearers The American share of world coal production remained steady at about 20 percent from 1980 to 2005, at about 1 billion short tons per year. The United States was ranked as the 2nd coal producing country in the world in 2010, and possesses the largest coal reserves in the world. In 2008 then-President George W. Bush stated that coal was the most reliable source of electricity.[61] However, in 2011 President Barack Obama said that the US should rely more on "clean" sources of energy that emit lower or no carbon dioxide pollution.[62] As of 2013, while domestic coal consumption for electric power was being displaced by natural gas, exports were increasing. US coal production increasingly comes from strip mines in the western United States, such as from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana.[63] Coal has come under continued price pressure from natural gas and renewable energy sources, which has resulted in a rapid decline of coal in the U.S. and several notable bankruptcies including Peabody Energy. On April 13, 2016 it reported, its revenue tumbled 17 percent as coal price fell and lost 2 billion dollars on the previous year.[64] It then filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy on April 13, 2016.[64] The Harvard Business Review discussed retraining coal workers for solar photovoltaic employment because of the rapid rise in U.S. solar jobs.[65] A recent study indicated that this was technically possible and would account for only 5% of the industrial revenue from a single year to provide coal workers with job security in the energy industry as whole. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining
Views: 527 Way Back
Abandoned West Virginia: Coal Mining Town
 
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On today's Abandoned America, the Pexped team heads to West Virginia in search of a lost coal mining town called Nuttallburg. Located in the New River Gorge, Nuttallburg is one of the many abandoned coal towns along the river. In this video we explore the Head-house located at the top of the gorge. A steep half-mile down cliffs and caves you will arrive at the mine entrance and Head-house. For more information including our source, please visit: https://www.nps.gov/neri/planyourvisit/upload/Nuttallburg-brochure-for-print-2.pdf Visit our website at www.pexped.com Music: Echos Of Time - Wonders by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100283 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Plantation by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Artist: http://audionautix.com/
Views: 18316 PEXPED
Coal Mining in Oklahoma. 1952
 
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Identifier: F2010.108.1.050 Description:Black and white film with audio. Film shows men mining coal at Star Coal Company a few miles east of Henryetta, Oklahoma. Film shows men working on the removal of coal from the the mine and the separation and grading process once it is extracted from the mine. The importance of the telephone is shown as a way for miners to communicate with crews above ground while working underground. Creator: Southwestern Bell Oklahoma Coverage: Henryetta (City), in Oklahoma (USA) MARC Geographic Areas: Oklahoma (oku); United States (xxu) Extent: (quantity/size) 7min 44sec Media: 16 mm film; Moving Images,AVI 1920X1080 29.97 FRAME RATE Subjects: Mines and mining To purchase a DVD or broadcast quality digital file contact us: http://www.okhistory.org/ /ohfees
AMERICA REVEALED | Where Does Our Coal Come From? | PBS
 
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See the full episode at http://video.pbs.org/video/2226356267/ Did you know coal supplies nearly half of America's electricity? Visit Black Thunder Mine with Yul Kwon and discover how we mine this pivotal material. See more in the four-part AMERICA REVEALED, Wednesdays, April 11- May 2 at 10/9c on PBS.
Views: 74096 PBS
Anthracite Coal Mining circa 1920
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "Lots of diagrammatic animation. Anthracite coal mining. Underground mining shots." Silent. Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A Public domain film from the Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%... Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the lion's share of production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Terminology Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal (not to be confused with the German Steinkohle or Dutch steenkool which are broader terms meaning all varieties of coal of a stonelike hardness and appearance, like bituminous coal and often anthracite as well, as opposed to lignite, which is softer), blind coal (in Scotland), Kilkenny coal (in Ireland), crow coal (or craw coal from its shiny black appearance), and black diamond. "Blue Coal" is the term for a once-popular and trademarked brand... Anthracite is similar in appearance to the mineraloid jet and is sometimes used as a jet imitation. Anthracite differs from ordinary bituminous coal by its greater hardness, its higher relative density of 1.3--1.4, and lustre, which is often semi-metallic with a mildly brown reflection. It contains a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter... The moisture content of fresh-mined anthracite generally is less than 15 percent. The heat content of anthracite ranges from 22 to 28 million Btu per short ton (26 to 33 MJ/kg) on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis... Anthracite may be considered to be a transition stage between ordinary bituminous and graphite, produced by the more or less complete elimination of the volatile constituents of the former... History of mining and use In southwest Wales, anthracite has been burned as a domestic fuel since at least medieval times. It was mined near Saundersfoot. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region... By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River... In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States... Many large public buildings, such as schools, were heated with anthracite-burning furnaces through the 1980s... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery... Coal mining has had a lot of developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyor, jacks and shearers...
Views: 12367 Jeff Quitney
America's Worst Mining Disasters
 
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Coal Mining
Views: 9823 Gail Taylor
Stock Footage - Coal Mining in Early America
 
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Archive Footage - Black & White - The Coal Mining industry of America. For this and more Footage visit: http://www.myfootage.com/details.php?gid=58&sgid=&pid=16206#tn This clip is available for licensing from MyFootage.com - Call us at (212) 620-3955 - Please Subscribe to our channel, as we are constantly adding new clips. Thanks!
Views: 3820 MyFootage.com
The Coal Town System
 
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West Virginia coal operators built small, company-owned towns for their miners to live in. The coal towns were almost always unincorporated; there were no elected officials, no independent police forces. Owners hired private detective agencies to watch over their workforce. Company towns were also untethered from the free market competition owners usually championed. "The Mine Wars" premieres January 26, 2016 on American Experience PBS.
Views: 9367 AmericanExperiencePBS
Oral History, Coal Mining in West Virginia
 
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This is a project for American History at NorthPoint Bible College
Views: 1653 Christopher T
Cursed by Coal: Mining the Navajo Nation
 
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There's a resource curse on the Navajo Nation. The 27,000-square-mile reservation straddling parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah has an extremely high abundance of many energy resources — particularly coal. That coal is what's burned to provide much of the Southwest with electricity, and it creates jobs for the Navajo. But the mining and burning have also caused environmental degradation, serious health issues, and displacement. VICE News travels to the Navajo Nation to find out how its abundance of coal is affecting the future of the Navajo people. Watch “Toxic: Coal Ash” - http://bit.ly/1zDaW66 Watch “Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City” - http://bit.ly/1E2YejO Read "Line 61, the Oil Pipeline That Will Dwarf Keystone XL” - http://bit.ly/18iOKad Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 172445 VICE News
Harlan County: A Road To Change (Documentary)
 
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Harlan County: A Road to Change (Completed 2014) Shows the history of coal from the early 1900s to today, the past, the turmoil, the tragedy, and how the county is using adventure tourism to share their treasures in the county. (c) 2014 Kaci Productions, LLC To use this video you must have written permission from the producer. Contact at [email protected] Be courteous in your comments. Negative comments or hateful remarks or other of the like towards the video, people of Harlan, or those commenting here, may be deleted at the producer's discretion. Music by Harlan County Underground Poem by Connie Helton Video & Aerial footage by Tammy & Jeff Hyatt Photos & zipline footage by Paula Collins Interviews by Jerry Asher & Mike O'Bradovich Opening Cast by Noah Hughs & A L Feher Narration by C Andrew Bartlett Thanks to Kentucky Coal Mining Museum & Portal 31 for access Thanks to all involved who helped bring this to life, all of your names are listed in the final credits of the documentary video.
Views: 167338 Kaci Productions
12 Dead, 10 Missing in W.V. Coal Mine Explosion
 
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An explosion rocked a remote West Virginia coal mine with a history of safety problems, killing 12 workers and trapping at least 10 others thousands of feet underground in the worst U.S. mine disaster since 2006. (April 5)
Views: 19266 Associated Press
The Collapse of Coal
 
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American coal is in crisis. Production is down. Mining companies have declared bankruptcy. So how did America's coal industry get in this situation? And what will happen to America's coal communities? Inside Energy and The Allegheny Front teamed up to look at the collapse of coal.
Views: 30515 Inside Energy
COAL: The documentary
 
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The Northwest is square in the middle of a controversial global debate: Should the region build export terminals that would open lucrative markets for the world's dirtiest fossil fuel? As the U.S. economy continues to struggle, can the country afford not to? COAL is a KCTS 9 and EarthFix original documentary. For more information on the documentary, visit: kcts9.org/coal or earthfix.us/coaldoc. For ongoing reporting on Coal in the Northwest, visit EarthFix: earthfix.info/coal/ Credits Written, Directed and Produced by Katie Campbell Photography by Michael Werner Katie Campbell Editor Michael Werner Narrator Katie Campbell EarthFix reporters Ashley Ahearn Bonnie Stewart Amelia Templeton Courtney Flatt Cassandra Profita Aaron Kunz Aerial photography by Katie Campbell Aerial support provided by Christopher Boyer, LightHawk Hunter Handsfield, LightHawk Additional photography Aaron Kunz Stock Footage - RevoStock Audio post production Milt Ritter Post Production Support Lisa Strube-Kilgore Phil Williams Chris Maske Music Lonely Rails Written by Seth Warren and C. Andrew Rohrmann. Performed by Seth Warren. Published by Sciencelab. Salt Flats Written by Miguel D'Oliveira. Published by BBC Production Music. Like a Phoenix Written by Steve Carter. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. Celtic Mist Written by Al Lethbridge. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. Pistola Written by Geoff Levin. Published by ZFC Music. Fluttering Leaves Written by Daniel Pemberton. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. The Couple Written by Al Lethbridge. Published by BBC Production Music. Halcyon Skies Written by Ben Hales and Matt Hales. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. The Loner Written by Miguel D'Oliveira. Published by BBC Production Music. Special Thanks to Dustin Bleizeffer Shannon Anderson LightHawk Keith Williams Thunder Basin Coal Company Leroy Rohde Andy Rohrmann Tom Lubnau Columbia River Pilots Aaron Toso Courtney Wallace Lauri Hennessey
Views: 141047 EarthFixMedia
How Coal Mines Work: "Mining and Preparation of Anthracite Coal" c 1934 Delaware & Lackawanna Coal
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net Very good demonstration of coal mining processes in the 1930s. 'Underground mining scenes... Sequence shows miners leaving work, washing up and going home to greet families.' NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jo9qxONgd4s Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Anthracite (Greek ἀνθρακίτης (anthrakítes), "coal-like," from ἄνθραξ (ánthrax), coal) is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%. The term is applied to those varieties of coal which do not give off tarry or other hydrocarbon vapours when heated below their point of ignition. Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the majority of global production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal... blind coal... Kilkenny coal... crow coal... and black diamond. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region. Legend has it that Allen fell asleep at the base of Broad Mountain and woke to the sight of a large fire because his campfire had ignited an outcropping of anthracite coal. By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River. Anthracite was first experimentally burned as a residential heating fuel in the US on 11 February 1808, by Judge Jesse Fell in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, on an open grate in a fireplace. Anthracite differs from wood in that it needs a draft from the bottom, and Judge Fell proved with his grate design that it was a viable heating fuel. In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917... From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States, until it was supplanted first by oil burning systems and more recently by natural gas systems... China today mines by far the largest share of global anthracite production, accounting for more than three-quarters of global output. Most Chinese production is of standard-grade anthracite, which is used in power generation. Increased demand in China has made that country into a net importer of the fuel, mostly from Vietnam, another major producer of anthracite for power generation, although increasing domestic consumption in Vietnam means that exports may be scaled back. Current U.S. anthracite production averages around 5 million tons per year. Of that, about 1.8 million tons were mined in the state of Pennsylvania...
Views: 36026 Jeff Quitney
The Decline of Coal in Southern Illinois
 
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A look inside the American Coal Company's New Era and New Future coal mines in Galatia, Illinois. LET'S CONNECT: Chicago Tribune ► http://trib.in/1ErxACI Google+ ► http://bit.ly/1MFPEfY Twitter ► http://bit.ly/1wSjSsz Facebook ► http://on.fb.me/18Ui46X Instagram ► http://bit.ly/1xt4hKL
Views: 1836 Chicago Tribune
11 Most Massive Mines in the World
 
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From the worlds largest gold mine found on the top of a mountain to the largest diamond mine in the world here are the most massive mines in the world! Subscribe to American EYE! 5.. Asbestos Mine, Canada Also known as the Jeffrey Mine, it’s located in Asbestos, Quebec and it was in operation until 2012. It’s a whopping 2 kilometers wide and 370 meters deep! Check out this thing on google maps and you can tell how completely massive this thing is! It’s the by far the largest asbestos mine in the world. For a long period of time, people would use this mineral to put into their walls and keep their homes from catching on fire! But recently there’s been a link with asbestos and a disease called mesothelioma, which is a lung condition. This is a toxic substance that people should avoid, so obviously this large mine went out of business. The lake at the bottom might look like an inviting blue, but you can bet your bottom dollar, it’s highly toxic! The small town that grew with the thriving asbestos industry feels like they’ve kind of lost their identity once the mine was forced to close, but people do still live there. 4. Mcarthur River Uranium Mine In case you were wondering which mine produces the most uranium in the world, that would be of course the Mcarthur River uranium mine in Saskatchewan Canada. This huge deposit was found in 1988 and finally a mining operation took place in 1997, when it began producing what’s known as Yellowcake. It’s not the kind of yellow cake you’d eat with your grandparents. This stuff has a horrific odor and basically what it is, is concentrated uranium powder which can then be used for powering nuclear reactors. We imagine this powdery substance is quite difficult to get ahold of. There aren’t a ton of photos of this place but, it does produce about 13 percent of the global uranium production across the globe. 3. Diavik Diamond Mine In case you thought it was Africa who had all the massive diamond mines, think again! The Diavik Diamond mine, found in the the northwest territories of Canada is one of the largest producers of diamonds in the Northern hemisphere and this place is pretty crazy! They annually produce 7 million carats of diamonds each year and you better believe it’s not easy to get here. The Diavik mine is found north of the arctic circle and it’s definitely cold! This photo here shows the subarctic landscapes that surround the diamond mine. You thought getting to work in the morning was tough for you? Imagine trying to get to work here! Just recently in 2015, this diamond produced what was known as the Diavik Foxfire 187.7 which is one of the largest rough gem quality diamonds ever produced. 2. Siberian Diamond Mine Also known as the Mirny Mine, The USSR began searching for ways to make to make themselves a more economical stable and independent union. In 1955 the Soviets discovered large diamond deposits at this site in the far away lands of Siberia and many people got to work very quickly in order to help bring wealth to the union. After about 20 years of operations, they finally decided that At one point this mine produced 10 million carats of diamonds a year and reaches a max depth of 524 meters or around 1700 feet making it the 2nd largest excavated hole in the world. The mine is so deep, airspace is closed over the hole due to helicopter crashes caused from the downward flow of air. The construction of this in the frigid conditions of Siberia must have been grueling and downright cruel. Sources state that the machinery used at this mine had to be covered at night or it would freeze Are the diamonds worth freezing to death?! It’s unoperational today but Some claim that there’s still a bunch of diamonds in this mine and the whole thing could be worth about 12 Billion dollars. It’s possible that controlling this diamond is mine is crucial to controlling the price of diamonds across the world. Bingham Copper Mine The bingham copper mine located near Salt Lake City Utah is home to the biggest pit in the world and it’s been in operation since 1903. It’s about 2.5 miles wide and if it were a stadium, it would be able to fit an estimated 9.5 million people. It keeps getting bigger and bigger too! Diligent workers can move about 250,000 tons of rock each day and it’s even become a tourist attraction in recent years before a massive landslide took place. Some claim that this was the biggest non volcanic landslide to take place in North American modern history. This photo we see here shows you the aftermath of this massive landslide and Bingham Copper mine and it makes you wonder how safe some of the conditions at these mines truly are. The landslides were so massive, that they actually triggered a few small earthquakes! Experts estimated that 165 tons of earth slide down from the top of the mine all the way to the bottom.
Views: 24989 American Eye
Springhill Mining Disaster
 
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Support BDHQ http://www.patreon.com/baddayhq The 1958 bump, which occurred on October 23, 1958, was the most severe "bump" (underground earthquake) in North American mining history. The 1958 bump devastated the people of Springhill for the casualties they suffered; it also devastated the town, as the coal industry had been its economic lifeblood. After five and a half days (therefore around the morning of Wednesday, October 29, 1958), contact was established with a group of 12 survivors on the other side of a 160-foot (49 m) rockfall. A rescue tunnel was dug; it broke through to the trapped miners at 2:25 am on Thursday, October 30, 1958. Having a bad day? I bet we have worse ones for you. Sound off in the comments on your thoughts and what you'd like to see next! SUBSCRIBE today to get the latest true crime and disaster documentaries delivered to you weekly! All content is copyright of Partners in Motion INC. Join us on social media: https://www.facebook.com/partnersinmotion/?view_public_for=1003857803032519 https://twitter.com/PartnersHarmony https://plus.google.com/u/0/109232389902601257458 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Want to survive a real disaster or enhance a camping trip? Support Bad Day HQ by ordering some of our personally selected products: Best selling SAS Survival guide: https://goo.gl/IUms75 72-Hour emergency survival kit: https://goo.gl/FLkEOh LifeStraw portable water filter: https://goo.gl/hzBOz0 BioLite dual wood burning stove and USB charger: https://goo.gl/X8mDXK
Views: 27408 Bad Day HQ
African-American coal miners on life in Appalachia
 
01:05
"United Shades of America with W. Kamau Bell" visits coal country and finds African-American residents with a unique perspective on life in and outside eastern Kentucky's mines. Watch Sundays at 10 p.m. ET/PT.
Views: 5370 CNN
Harlan County, USA.avi
 
03:04
This film documents the coal miners' strike against the Brookside Mine of the Eastover Mining Company in Harlan County, Kentucky in June, 1973. Eastovers refusal to sign a contract (when the miners joined with the United Mine Workers of America) led to the strike, which lasted more than a year and included violent battles between gun-toting company thugs/scabs and the picketing miners and their supportive women-folk. Director Barbara Kopple puts the strike into perspective by giving us some background on the historical plight of the miners and some history of the UMWA.
Views: 78719 BenHughE
Coal Mines, Scranton, Pennsylvania - 1929
 
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This film of a Scranton Coal Mine was shot on December 8, 1929 by George Mann when Barto and Mann were playing at the Capital Theatre in Scranton, Pennsylvania. There's more about Pennsylvania Coal Mines here: http://samiaali.hubpages.com/hub/The-Pennsylvania-Coal-Miners There's more about Barto and Mann here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barto_and_Mann George Mann's photography here: http://www.thegeorgemannarchive.com/ And later in life here: http://onbunkerhill.org/georgemann
Views: 10825 Brad Smith
Appalachia coal mining history
 
05:50
Appalachia coal mining history fascinating: early days, dangerous tunnel in the ground. Latter day with heavy machinery, whole mountains are leveled to get to the coal. True, it's very hard on the landscape, but a lot easier on the miners.
Views: 2394 Steve Close
Hillbillies, Coalminers, Treehuggers and God | Explore Films
 
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http://www.explore.org - Travel to the heart of Appalachia and experience the hidden gem that is West Virginia. Feel the pulse of coal mining running through the veins of locals as well as hear the environmental opposition to the practice in this moving Explore special. Love Exploring - Subscribe http://goo.gl/q8AqMp http://explore.org - Facebook http://goo.gl/SFRAfX - Twitter http://goo.gl/n03NNU http://Explore.org is the worlds leading philanthropic live nature cam network and documentary film channel. Be sure to visit and subscribe to all your favorite EXPLORE channels. Explore Main Channel https://goo.gl/9L2vjH Explore Africa https://goo.gl/8GXlAz Explore Bears & Bison https://goo.gl/bKBhR8 Explore Birds Bats Bees https://goo.gl/chM5Zp Explore Cats Lions Tigers https://goo.gl/1m3vAd Explore Farm Life https://goo.gl/KVU98J Explore Dog Bless You https://goo.gl/F01N6i Explore Oceans https://goo.gl/6lKaus Explore Sunsets https://goo.gl/zfG1DI Explore Zen Dens https://goo.gl/Id1WMF
Colorado Experience: Ludlow Massacre
 
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One of the most significant events in the struggle for labor laws in America played out in Las Animas County in the spring of 1914. With the control of much of Colorado's coal mines in the hands of just a few companies, miners grew increasingly intolerant of low wages and dangerous working conditions. Despite efforts to suppress union activity, the United Mine Workers of America called a strike in September of 1913. Over the next few months, tensions escalated as the striking miners ransacked several mines. The dispute culminated in a violent clash on April 20, 1914. Despite this tragic outcome, the event sparked national outrage and led the way of workers' rights in America.
Views: 59145 Rocky Mountain PBS
Coal Miner
 
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Shows how the modern coal miner works and lives. Narration by coal miners who explain their wants and needs and tell why they enjoy working the mines. The film only superficially discusses mining techniques. Help us get more films like this online! Buy this film on DVD: http://www.avgeeks.com/wp2/store/products/coal-miner-on-dvd/
Views: 29990 A/V Geeks
History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation in the USA
 
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In 1891, Congress passed the first federal statute governing mine safety. This 1891 law was relatively modest legislation that applied only to mines in U.S. territories, and, among other things, established minimum ventilation requirements at underground coal mines and prohibited operators from employing children under 12 years of age. In 1910, following a decade in which the number of coal mine fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau of Mines as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was charged with the responsibility to conduct research and to reduce accidents in the coal mining industry, but was given no inspection authority until 1941, when Congress empowered federal inspectors to enter mines. In 1947, Congress authorized the formulation of the first code of federal regulations for mine safety. The Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952 provided for annual inspections in certain underground coal mines, and gave the Bureau limited enforcement authority, including power to issue violation notices and imminent danger withdrawal orders. In 1966, Congress extended coverage of the 1952 Coal Act to all underground coal mines. The first federal statute directly regulating non-coal mines did not appear until the passage of the Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Act of 1966. The 1966 Act provided for the promulgation of standards, many of which were advisory, and for inspections and investigations; however, its enforcement authority was minimal. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous Federal legislation governing the mining industry. The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines. The Coal Act also required monetary penalties for all violations, and established criminal penalties for knowing and willful violations. The safety standards for all coal mines were strengthened, and health standards were adopted. The Coal Act included specific procedures for the development of improved mandatory health and safety standards, and provided compensation for miners who were totally and permanently disabled by the progressive respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of fine coal dust pneumoconiosis or "black lung". Most recently, Congress passed the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act), the legislation which currently governs MSHA's activities. The Mine Act amended the 1969 Coal Act in a number of significant ways, and consolidated all federal health and safety regulations of the mining industry, coal as well as non-coal mining, under a single statutory scheme. The Mine Act strengthened and expanded the rights of miners, and enhanced the protection of miners from retaliation for exercising such rights. Mining fatalities dropped sharply under the Mine Act from 272 in 1977 to 86 in 2000. Additionally, the Mine Act established the independent Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission to provide for independent review of the majority of MSHA's enforcement actions. This was clipped from the 2002 MSHA video, Reflections Mining History, which shows the evolution of health and safety laws and the role of the supervisor. The entire DVD is 11 minutes in length and available from MSHA.
Views: 26588 markdcatlin
Anthracite Coal Mining Pennsylvania - A Day in the Life of a Coal Miner
 
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A vintage silent film depicting a day in the life of a Pennsylvania Anthracite Coal miner.
Views: 15716 Jim Roberts
Anthracite Coal Mining: "Black Sunlight" circa 1920s Bray Studios
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "On anthracite coal mining--with animation showing how coal was created underground--Pan over valley in anthracite region of Pennsylvania -- strip mining deep mining--mining footage -- cars of crude coal to breaker removing waste from coal -- pile of tailing -- sizing of coal pieces loading on railroad cars -- pan over loaded railcars, trains rolling." Silent. NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUTcnq0Lg90 Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A Originally a public domain film from the Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%... Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the lion's share of production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Terminology Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal (not to be confused with the German Steinkohle or Dutch steenkool which are broader terms meaning all varieties of coal of a stonelike hardness and appearance, like bituminous coal and often anthracite as well, as opposed to lignite, which is softer), blind coal (in Scotland), Kilkenny coal (in Ireland), crow coal (or craw coal from its shiny black appearance), and black diamond. "Blue Coal" is the term for a once-popular and trademarked brand... Anthracite is similar in appearance to the mineraloid jet and is sometimes used as a jet imitation. Anthracite differs from ordinary bituminous coal by its greater hardness, its higher relative density of 1.3--1.4, and lustre, which is often semi-metallic with a mildly brown reflection. It contains a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter... The moisture content of fresh-mined anthracite generally is less than 15 percent. The heat content of anthracite ranges from 22 to 28 million Btu per short ton (26 to 33 MJ/kg) on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis... Anthracite may be considered to be a transition stage between ordinary bituminous and graphite, produced by the more or less complete elimination of the volatile constituents of the former... History of mining and use In southwest Wales, anthracite has been burned as a domestic fuel since at least medieval times. It was mined near Saundersfoot. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region... By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River... In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States... Many large public buildings, such as schools, were heated with anthracite-burning furnaces through the 1980s... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery... Coal mining has had a lot of developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyor, jacks and shearers...
Views: 38459 Jeff Quitney
5 Worst Jobs Given To Children In History
 
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Throughout history children have often been utilised as nothing more than cheap and convenient labour, forced to undertake a whole host of unbelievable and downright dangerous jobs. In an age before legislation which protects the rights of workers, and enforces a minimum working age, young children were often at the mercy of ruthless adults, keen to exploit them for personal profit. So next time you think you are having a bad day at work, spare a thought for these unfortunate souls… 5. Mudlarks 4. Mule Scavengers 3. Coal Miners 2. Chimney Sweeps 1. Powder Monkeys Read articles on my website: http://www.Unknown5.com/ Say hi on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Unknown5-1536133216686538 Tweet me at Twitter: https://twitter.com/Unknown5TV Music by CO.AG: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcavSftXHgxLBWwLDm_bNvA Track used: "The Lost" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpowIDAOMhc
Views: 531051 Unknown5
Working conditions during the industrial revolution
 
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i made this video for my US history class. 100%... damn straight
Views: 31349 drew langsdale
Coal Mining in Appalachia
 
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This video is about Coal Mining via Mountain Top Removal. Appalachian Coal Mining See how coal is mined in the Appalachian Mountains via Mountain Top Removal. This 30 minute video takes you inside a giant dragline and tells the whole story from blasting the rock to transporting the coal by rail. See Elk enjoying the reclaimed land. I started this project in 2002.
Views: 234376 Gary Smith
Lackawanna Coal Mine Tour
 
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Nick the History Kid and his friend Arseniy from Moscow, Russia travel to Scranton, Pennsylvania to visit one of the best industrial museums in America. Both Nick and Arseniy descend 300 feet into the earth the same way miners did on a unique underground railroad. They pass through 3 different veins of hard coal. Retrieved 7/7/14 from http://www.lackawannacounty.org/index.php/attractions/coal-mine
Views: 2544 NICKTHEHISTORYKID
On the discovery of an ancient coal mine
 
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When a mechnical excavator fell down a hole during the construction of the M66 motorway in Lancashire in 1976, it led to the discovery of a hitherto unknown 19th century coalmine. The presentation includes record shots underground. For many more coal mining and heritage photos see my website www.heritagephotoarchive.co.uk
Views: 63116 Ken Howarth
Buried Alive - The Chilean Mine Rescue
 
47:04
"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."
Views: 597663 DadoTheGoodVillain
Living in a Coal Town
 
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A brief documentary of coal mining in America. Hannah's school project for summer enrichment program.
Views: 56112 Robert Taub
The History of Gold Mines documentary
 
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Around the world and across the eons, gold stands as a symbol of power, wealth, and love. The quest for the yellow metal took men across oceans, into the depths of the Alaskan winter, and miles beneath South African earth. This is the story of the hunters of the precious metal and their methods for extracting it.