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Coal Mining Documentary - The Most Dangerous Job On Earth - Classic History
 
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Coal Mining Documentary - The Most Dangerous Job On Earth - Classic History Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine a pit, and the above-ground structures the pit head. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States "colliery" has been used to describe a coal mine operation but nowadays the word is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunnelling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, hydraulic jacks and shearers. Small-scale mining of surface deposits dates back thousands of years. For example, in Roman Britain, the Romans were exploiting most of the major coalfields by the late 2nd century AD. Read More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining
Views: 9238 Classic History
Coal mining in America's heartland | DW Documentary
 
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West Virginia, USA - under its wild mountain idyll hides the "black hell": A labyrinth of dark tunnels - hard life in a coal mine. [Online until: 15 August 2019] "Wild, wonderful West Virginia” - that’s how the small state nestled in the Appalachian Mountains bills itself. This documentary reports on the daily struggle facing local coal miners hoping for help from Donald Trump; a sheriff combating the opioid epidemic that has already claimed thousands of lives; and a Cherokee environmental activist whose efforts have earned her intimidation and threats. The whistle of a locomotive at the front of an old coal train, quiet winding roads, and hardly a highway to be found - that’s still the image that many have of West Virginia today. But beneath the forest-covered mountains lies a labyrinth of tunnels just one meter high, in which miners still spend their entire working days toiling in the dark on their hands and knees. The camera team accompanies a traditional coal mining family as they go about their day. Together with the family’s two sons, Scott and Steven Lockhart, the crew ventures into the mine. Conversations with the miners reveal why people who had been lifelong Democratic Party supporters are suddenly placing their hopes for the future in Donald Trump. But the documentary also ventures beyond the coal mines to uncover the lesser-known sides of this Appalachian state - from snake-handling Pentecostal churches to the bluegrass and mountain ballads of Alan Cathead Johnston. We also speak with Sheriff Martin West, who sued the country’s three biggest pharmaceutical makers for their role in the opioid epidemic that has swept the region. And we meet another person who has decided to fight back: Maria Gunnoe, a young Cherokee activist who has dared to take on the coal barons that are ravaging the beautiful mountains of West Virginia. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 397558 DW Documentary
Coal Mining: The Disasters and the History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation
 
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A public domain video A film about the history of underground coal mining throughout the years. The disasters and the health regulations. -The Monongah Mining Disaster was the worst mining accident in American history; 362 men and young boys were killed in an underground explosion on December 6, 1907 in Monongah, West Virginia. -Following a decade in which the number of coal mining fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau Of Mines in 1910 as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was to investigate accidents, advise industry, conduct production and safety research, and teach courses in accident prevention, first aid, and mine rescue. However, Congress did not empower the federal inspectors to enter and inspect mines until 1941, and did not authorize a code of federal regulations for mine safety until 1947. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Acts of 1969 and 1977 set greater safety standards for the industry. Where annual mining deaths had numbered more than 1,000 a year in the early part of the 20th century, they decreased to an average of about 500 in the late 1950s. Subscribe - never miss a video! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_S8ZlDCRkMMgc7ciw8X-hg The 20th Century Time Machine takes you back in time to the most important historical events of the past century. Watch documentaries, discussions and real footage of major events that shaped the world we live in today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHAZA5h5cmo
Views: 2646 npatou
The Unheard Story Of Appalachia's Coal, Part 1
 
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Eastern Kentucky and most of Appalachia had a thriving coal industry for more than 100 years. We went to coal country to talk to people about just how important coal has been to the region and how much Appalachia has changed with its decline. Part 2: https://youtu.be/UJxCqHoUAT8 Part 3: https://youtu.be/hYEEBpHJMAQ Additional archival photos provided by the SKCTC Appalachian Archives, from their U.S. Coal & Coke, International Harvester, Ewell Balltrip and Kentucky Coal Museum Photo Collections. Subscribe for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV3Nm3T-XAgVhKH9jT0ViRg?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish Download the AJ+ app at http://www.ajplus.net/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajplus
Views: 71272 AJ+
Harlan County, USA
 
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Harlan County, USA is a 1976 Oscar-winning documentary film covering the "Brookside Strike", an effort of 180 coal miners and their wives against the Duke Power Company-owned Eastover Coal Company's Brookside Mine and Prep Plant in Harlan County, southeast Kentucky in 1973.[2] Directed and produced by Barbara Kopple, who has long been an advocate of workers' rights, Harlan County, U.S.A. is less ambivalent in its attitude toward unions than her later American Dream, the account of the Hormel Foods strike in Austin, Minnesota in 1985-86. Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - documentaries
Views: 63816 Karl Hungus
Coal Rush (FULL DOCUMENTARY)
 
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Filmed over 5 years in the coalfields of West Virginia, COAL RUSH follows the relentless battle for justice of a rural Appalachian community against a major coal company accused of polluting their drinking water. Husband-and-wife team of independent filmmakers LORENA LUCIANO and FILIPPO PISCOPO shine a spotlight on one of the worst (yet least publicized) industrial contamination disasters in the United States -- billions of gallons of coal waste dumped in the waterways and dwarfing the BP Gulf oil spill. Granted exclusive access by the legal team, and capturing with eloquent cinema verite'-style the local community's everyday life, the directors expose a serious case of environmental wrongdoing from all angles – including the coal company's standpoint -­ while bringing an important story of human suffering into focus. COAL RUSH offers an unprecedented look at some of the most pressing social and environmental issues in America today – concerns over toxins in US tap water, rural poverty, corporate malfeasance, and government failings – through the universally-appealing story of a highly controversial legal saga.
Views: 12907 The Orchard On Demand
American Coal Mining |  Strip Mines | Fossil Fuels | Appalachian Mountains | 1974
 
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FOR OVER 25 YEARS COAL COMPANIES HAVE STRIP MINED THOUSAND OF ACRES OF AMERICAN APPALCHIAN MOUNTAINS. THOUSAND OF ACRES OF COUNTRY ARE LAID WASTE AS WHOLE MOUNTAINSIDE ARE BLASTED AND BULLDOZED TO REACH OFTEN TINY COAL SEAMS. ONE OF THE BIGGEST LAND OWNERS IN THE AREA IS THE BRITISH COMPANY "AMERICAN ASSOCIATION LTD" WHICH FORMS PART OF AN INTERNATIONAL EMPIRE HEADED BY AN EX LORD MAYOR OF LONDON, SIR DENYS LOWSON. First Shown: 25/07/1974 If you would like to license a clip from this video please e mail: [email protected] Quote: VT9724
Views: 19171 ThamesTv
Racial and Ethnic Boundaries in the Coal Mines
 
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To meet the growing demand for coal in the early 20th century, West Virginia companies needed more miners. African Americans mixed with European immigrants and native Appalachians in the mines and the coal towns. Coal operators felt that diversity would keep unionization at bay. "The Mine Wars" premieres on American Experience PBS January 26, 2015.
Views: 4253 AmericanExperiencePBS
Sago Mine Disaster
 
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Thirteen men sat in the best barricade they could build, enduring...hoping. They had used their single hour of oxygen from the only Self Contained Self Rescuer issued to them by the company. Their families waited outside living through one of the most difficult times of their lives, praying to see their loved ones once again. As time wore on, we would learn the ultimate fate of those men, those husbands, those fathers, those grandfathers, brothers, uncles, nephews. One was alive, barely holding on…the others had perished in the thick poisoned air of the mine. The miners of Sago were like so many of us. They took one of the few jobs available to them, jobs that would allow them to live in the places they had long called home, jobs that would pay enough to support their families. If only the company had given them more than one SCSR—if only there had been a law—but we know how much power money holds over the hearts of men. It would be the suffering and tragic loss of life of those 12 brave souls—the pain of constant loss felt by their families—that would finally see to it that every coal miner in the United States would never face the same crisis. Millions of Americans became outraged at the events that played out on their televisions, and the ensuing public outcry would accomplish a feat that has seldom been accomplished in the history of US coal mining—the power of coal industry lobbyists was outweighed by the voice of the public in the halls of government. Laws were passed and now additional SCSRs must be purchased by coal companies, underground safe havens must be built and supply miners with three day of oxygen, food, and water. Each time my crew passed a safe haven and SCSR stash on our way to the section, I would think of those men, I would think of their final hours. I would pay my respects to them in my own way and wish that the corruption of the coalfields had not taken their lives. I hope that other miners do the same and remember the day the miners of Sago perished and the hearts of their families were forever broken. May you all rest in peace. God Bless.
Views: 166651 Nick Mullins
EARLY DAYS - COAL MINE
 
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EARLY DAYS - COAL MINE
Views: 6501 frank arrowsmith
Stock Footage - Coal Mining in Early America
 
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Archive Footage - Black & White - The Coal Mining industry of America. For this and more Footage visit: http://www.myfootage.com/details.php?gid=58&sgid=&pid=16206#tn This clip is available for licensing from MyFootage.com - Call us at (212) 620-3955 - Please Subscribe to our channel, as we are constantly adding new clips. Thanks!
Views: 4131 MyFootage.com
The Mine Wars | PBS America
 
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Premieres 9pm, Wednesday 29 June on Freesat 156 | Sky 534 | Virgin Media 276 Following its European premiere at the Sheffield Doc Fest, this documentary recalls the struggle for trade union recognition by mine workers in West Virginia, a battle that lasted two decades. At the beginning of the 20th century, coal was the engine of American industrial progress. The coal industry employed over 700,000 men, yet few Americans gave much thought to the price paid by those whose working days were spent underground. With entire communities owned by the mining companies, conditions and pay were strictly controlled. The stage was set for conflict, and the spark that ignited the flame arrived in 1901 in the shape of Mary Harris "Mother" Jones, an outspoken labour organiser and activist. West Virginian miners went on strike in 1902, with the employees demanding shorter workdays, higher wages and recognition of the union. It was to be the first of a series of industrial disputes that frequently erupted into violence, with successive state governors being forced to declare martial law as the coal companies engaged paramilitary forces to combat the strikers, who themselves were heavily armed. Superior force was eventually to prevail, however, and in the early 1920s the strikes eventually petered out. It would not be until 1933 that Congress passed legislation guaranteeing the workers' right to unionise.
Views: 4187 PBS America
The Coal Town System
 
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West Virginia coal operators built small, company-owned towns for their miners to live in. The coal towns were almost always unincorporated; there were no elected officials, no independent police forces. Owners hired private detective agencies to watch over their workforce. Company towns were also untethered from the free market competition owners usually championed. "The Mine Wars" premieres January 26, 2016 on American Experience PBS.
Views: 14304 AmericanExperiencePBS
AMERICA REVEALED | Where Does Our Coal Come From? | PBS
 
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See the full episode at http://video.pbs.org/video/2226356267/ Did you know coal supplies nearly half of America's electricity? Visit Black Thunder Mine with Yul Kwon and discover how we mine this pivotal material. See more in the four-part AMERICA REVEALED, Wednesdays, April 11- May 2 at 10/9c on PBS.
Views: 93619 PBS
Coal Mining 1920s - 1930s (1920-1939)
 
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Unissued / unused material. Compilation of coal mining material from the 1920s and 1930s. VS of men walking to the coal face. Shots of pit ponies. Miners' Lamps of different kinds. Men work the coal with picks and carry the coal away from the seam. MS of men drinking and eating 'snap' during break. Shots of early cutting machines in use in pit. Coal trucks are pushed back from the face. VS of steam power and pithead winding gear. Very quickly cut montage of winding gear in use bringing cage up the shaft at a colliery. VS of men leaving cage at end of a shift and handing in their tally tokens. VS of houses in mining village. Shots of men going home as smoke rises from chimneys. VS of railway yard with lots of coal trucks. Points are changed automatically. VS of coal being delivered on horse and cart by coal merchant. VS of coal being off loaded from ships and fed into power stations and factories. VS of chimneys and winding gear. FILM ID:3409.06 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 14699 British Pathé
Working conditions during the industrial revolution
 
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i made this video for my US history class. 100%... damn straight
Views: 40812 drew langsdale
Out In The Coal Patch: Life in the Coal Mining Towns of Western Pennsylvania
 
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Lecture by Gary Rogers Oakmont Historical Society Lecture Series Oakmont Carnegie Library 11/27/2017 Just as coal provided energy for the steel industry, coal provided a way life for coal miners. In this Oakmont Historical Society lecture, we take a look up the Allegheny River and into the lives of the miners and community life out in the coal patch. For more information contact us at www.oakmonthistoricalsociety.org or join us on Facebook. * for future notice of upcoming videos, please subscribe to our channel. Thanks for watching.
A History of Coal's Extraordinary Impact on Human Civilization (2003)
 
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The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States "colliery" has historically been used to describe a coal mine operation, but the word today is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, jacks and shearers The American share of world coal production remained steady at about 20 percent from 1980 to 2005, at about 1 billion short tons per year. The United States was ranked as the 2nd coal producing country in the world in 2010, and possesses the largest coal reserves in the world. In 2008 then-President George W. Bush stated that coal was the most reliable source of electricity.[61] However, in 2011 President Barack Obama said that the US should rely more on "clean" sources of energy that emit lower or no carbon dioxide pollution.[62] As of 2013, while domestic coal consumption for electric power was being displaced by natural gas, exports were increasing. US coal production increasingly comes from strip mines in the western United States, such as from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana.[63] Coal has come under continued price pressure from natural gas and renewable energy sources, which has resulted in a rapid decline of coal in the U.S. and several notable bankruptcies including Peabody Energy. On April 13, 2016 it reported, its revenue tumbled 17 percent as coal price fell and lost 2 billion dollars on the previous year.[64] It then filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy on April 13, 2016.[64] The Harvard Business Review discussed retraining coal workers for solar photovoltaic employment because of the rapid rise in U.S. solar jobs.[65] A recent study indicated that this was technically possible and would account for only 5% of the industrial revenue from a single year to provide coal workers with job security in the energy industry as whole. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining
Views: 875 Way Back
History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation in the USA
 
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In 1891, Congress passed the first federal statute governing mine safety. This 1891 law was relatively modest legislation that applied only to mines in U.S. territories, and, among other things, established minimum ventilation requirements at underground coal mines and prohibited operators from employing children under 12 years of age. In 1910, following a decade in which the number of coal mine fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau of Mines as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was charged with the responsibility to conduct research and to reduce accidents in the coal mining industry, but was given no inspection authority until 1941, when Congress empowered federal inspectors to enter mines. In 1947, Congress authorized the formulation of the first code of federal regulations for mine safety. The Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952 provided for annual inspections in certain underground coal mines, and gave the Bureau limited enforcement authority, including power to issue violation notices and imminent danger withdrawal orders. In 1966, Congress extended coverage of the 1952 Coal Act to all underground coal mines. The first federal statute directly regulating non-coal mines did not appear until the passage of the Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Act of 1966. The 1966 Act provided for the promulgation of standards, many of which were advisory, and for inspections and investigations; however, its enforcement authority was minimal. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous Federal legislation governing the mining industry. The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines. The Coal Act also required monetary penalties for all violations, and established criminal penalties for knowing and willful violations. The safety standards for all coal mines were strengthened, and health standards were adopted. The Coal Act included specific procedures for the development of improved mandatory health and safety standards, and provided compensation for miners who were totally and permanently disabled by the progressive respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of fine coal dust pneumoconiosis or "black lung". Most recently, Congress passed the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act), the legislation which currently governs MSHA's activities. The Mine Act amended the 1969 Coal Act in a number of significant ways, and consolidated all federal health and safety regulations of the mining industry, coal as well as non-coal mining, under a single statutory scheme. The Mine Act strengthened and expanded the rights of miners, and enhanced the protection of miners from retaliation for exercising such rights. Mining fatalities dropped sharply under the Mine Act from 272 in 1977 to 86 in 2000. Additionally, the Mine Act established the independent Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission to provide for independent review of the majority of MSHA's enforcement actions. This was clipped from the 2002 MSHA video, Reflections Mining History, which shows the evolution of health and safety laws and the role of the supervisor. The entire DVD is 11 minutes in length and available from MSHA.
Views: 30358 markdcatlin
Racial Harmony in an Iowa Coal Mining Town in the Early 1900s
 
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African-Americans and white residents lived side by side in the small mining town of Buxton, Iowa in the early 1900s. This segment from the "Searching for Buxton" documentary features accounts from former Buxton residents. Find additional video, background information and classroom resources at: http://site.iptv.org/iowapathways/mypath/great-buxton Searching for Buxton was produced for Iowa Public Television by the Communication Research Institute of William Penn University.
African-American coal miners on life in Appalachia
 
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"United Shades of America with W. Kamau Bell" visits coal country and finds African-American residents with a unique perspective on life in and outside eastern Kentucky's mines. Watch Sundays at 10 p.m. ET/PT.
Views: 6413 CNN
Colorado Experience: Ludlow Massacre
 
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One of the most significant events in the struggle for labor laws in America played out in Las Animas County in the spring of 1914. With the control of much of Colorado's coal mines in the hands of just a few companies, miners grew increasingly intolerant of low wages and dangerous working conditions. Despite efforts to suppress union activity, the United Mine Workers of America called a strike in September of 1913. Over the next few months, tensions escalated as the striking miners ransacked several mines. The dispute culminated in a violent clash on April 20, 1914. Despite this tragic outcome, the event sparked national outrage and led the way of workers' rights in America.
Views: 69512 Rocky Mountain PBS
A Day in the Life of a Wigan Coal Miner 1911
 
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Filmed by Keystone in 1911 for the LNWR ( London & North Western Railway ) who had their own full time film unit. The film was produced to feature both a typical Lancashire colliery served by the LNWR and also the women surface workers or Pit Brow Lasses who had been in the news after moves to legislate against their empoyment on the surface at collieries. More women surface workers were employed at Lancashire collieries than in any other coalfield. The colliery featured was Alexandra Colliery of Wigan Coal & Iron Co Ltd. Shafts were sunk at the colliery from 1856 in an ancient mining district, records going back to the 14th century. The shaft eventually reached 772 yards and the Arley seam. The famous Haigh Cannel seam was also accessed. The colliery closed in June 1955.
Views: 30368 Coal Board
Pennsylvania Anthracite Coal Mining
 
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Discover the Delaware & Lehigh Canal, a National Heritage Corridor. Visit http://www.delawareandlehigh.org/talesofthetowpath to learn about the recreational and learning opportunities the Corridor provides today. Tales of the Towpath is a children's book and educational curriculum about a man's return to his childhood, a journey back to an age when anthracite coal was fueling America's industries and canals were the country's highways. Let Finn Gorman guide you back in time on the interactive website at http://www.delawareandlehigh.org/talesofthetowpath.
Views: 11240 Finn Gorman
Anthracite Coal Mining circa 1920
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "Lots of diagrammatic animation. Anthracite coal mining. Underground mining shots." Silent. Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=... Public domain film from the Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%... Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the lion's share of production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Terminology Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal (not to be confused with the German Steinkohle or Dutch steenkool which are broader terms meaning all varieties of coal of a stonelike hardness and appearance, like bituminous coal and often anthracite as well, as opposed to lignite, which is softer), blind coal (in Scotland), Kilkenny coal (in Ireland), crow coal (or craw coal from its shiny black appearance), and black diamond. "Blue Coal" is the term for a once-popular and trademarked brand... Anthracite is similar in appearance to the mineraloid jet and is sometimes used as a jet imitation. Anthracite differs from ordinary bituminous coal by its greater hardness, its higher relative density of 1.3--1.4, and lustre, which is often semi-metallic with a mildly brown reflection. It contains a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter... The moisture content of fresh-mined anthracite generally is less than 15 percent. The heat content of anthracite ranges from 22 to 28 million Btu per short ton (26 to 33 MJ/kg) on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis... Anthracite may be considered to be a transition stage between ordinary bituminous and graphite, produced by the more or less complete elimination of the volatile constituents of the former... History of mining and use In southwest Wales, anthracite has been burned as a domestic fuel since at least medieval times. It was mined near Saundersfoot. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region... By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River... In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States... Many large public buildings, such as schools, were heated with anthracite-burning furnaces through the 1980s... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery... Coal mining has had a lot of developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyor, jacks and shearers...
Views: 166 Xiaomi Technology
11 Most Massive Mines in the World
 
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From the worlds largest gold mine found on the top of a mountain to the largest diamond mine in the world here are the most massive mines in the world! Subscribe to American EYE! 5.. Asbestos Mine, Canada Also known as the Jeffrey Mine, it’s located in Asbestos, Quebec and it was in operation until 2012. It’s a whopping 2 kilometers wide and 370 meters deep! Check out this thing on google maps and you can tell how completely massive this thing is! It’s the by far the largest asbestos mine in the world. For a long period of time, people would use this mineral to put into their walls and keep their homes from catching on fire! But recently there’s been a link with asbestos and a disease called mesothelioma, which is a lung condition. This is a toxic substance that people should avoid, so obviously this large mine went out of business. The lake at the bottom might look like an inviting blue, but you can bet your bottom dollar, it’s highly toxic! The small town that grew with the thriving asbestos industry feels like they’ve kind of lost their identity once the mine was forced to close, but people do still live there. 4. Mcarthur River Uranium Mine In case you were wondering which mine produces the most uranium in the world, that would be of course the Mcarthur River uranium mine in Saskatchewan Canada. This huge deposit was found in 1988 and finally a mining operation took place in 1997, when it began producing what’s known as Yellowcake. It’s not the kind of yellow cake you’d eat with your grandparents. This stuff has a horrific odor and basically what it is, is concentrated uranium powder which can then be used for powering nuclear reactors. We imagine this powdery substance is quite difficult to get ahold of. There aren’t a ton of photos of this place but, it does produce about 13 percent of the global uranium production across the globe. 3. Diavik Diamond Mine In case you thought it was Africa who had all the massive diamond mines, think again! The Diavik Diamond mine, found in the the northwest territories of Canada is one of the largest producers of diamonds in the Northern hemisphere and this place is pretty crazy! They annually produce 7 million carats of diamonds each year and you better believe it’s not easy to get here. The Diavik mine is found north of the arctic circle and it’s definitely cold! This photo here shows the subarctic landscapes that surround the diamond mine. You thought getting to work in the morning was tough for you? Imagine trying to get to work here! Just recently in 2015, this diamond produced what was known as the Diavik Foxfire 187.7 which is one of the largest rough gem quality diamonds ever produced. 2. Siberian Diamond Mine Also known as the Mirny Mine, The USSR began searching for ways to make to make themselves a more economical stable and independent union. In 1955 the Soviets discovered large diamond deposits at this site in the far away lands of Siberia and many people got to work very quickly in order to help bring wealth to the union. After about 20 years of operations, they finally decided that At one point this mine produced 10 million carats of diamonds a year and reaches a max depth of 524 meters or around 1700 feet making it the 2nd largest excavated hole in the world. The mine is so deep, airspace is closed over the hole due to helicopter crashes caused from the downward flow of air. The construction of this in the frigid conditions of Siberia must have been grueling and downright cruel. Sources state that the machinery used at this mine had to be covered at night or it would freeze Are the diamonds worth freezing to death?! It’s unoperational today but Some claim that there’s still a bunch of diamonds in this mine and the whole thing could be worth about 12 Billion dollars. It’s possible that controlling this diamond is mine is crucial to controlling the price of diamonds across the world. Bingham Copper Mine The bingham copper mine located near Salt Lake City Utah is home to the biggest pit in the world and it’s been in operation since 1903. It’s about 2.5 miles wide and if it were a stadium, it would be able to fit an estimated 9.5 million people. It keeps getting bigger and bigger too! Diligent workers can move about 250,000 tons of rock each day and it’s even become a tourist attraction in recent years before a massive landslide took place. Some claim that this was the biggest non volcanic landslide to take place in North American modern history. This photo we see here shows you the aftermath of this massive landslide and Bingham Copper mine and it makes you wonder how safe some of the conditions at these mines truly are. The landslides were so massive, that they actually triggered a few small earthquakes! Experts estimated that 165 tons of earth slide down from the top of the mine all the way to the bottom.
Views: 266187 American Eye
The Lackawana Coal Mine Tour
 
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A Look at The Anthracite Coal Industry in Northeast Pennsylvania. A detailed look - with news clips - of the 1959 Knox Mine Disaster.
Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes
 
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In Appalachia, coal companies blow the tops off of mountains to get at the coal. The damage this does to the surrounding environment and water supply is devastating. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About From The Ashes: From the Ashes captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and what its future should be in the current political climate. From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling and often heartbreaking stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes https://youtu.be/ynN39sfqT8w National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 82376 National Geographic
Spain Euthanized Its Coal Mines. This Is How Miners Are Taking It (HBO)
 
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The coal industry is dying a slow death in many parts of the world. But in Spain, the end was swift — and government-mandated. The country's version of a "Green New Deal" for coal included a compensation package for miners, which has received international praise from unions and environmental groups as other countries are looking to quit the fossil fuel. Through a deal struck between the Spanish government and coal mining companies and unions, almost all the country’s mines closed by the end of 2018, and around 1,500 miners were laid off. The phase-out agreement set aside 250 million euros for funding retirement packages, retraining and environmental restoration. The deal spurred protests around Spain in December. But outside the country, Spain’s handling of the coal phase-out has been praised. It’s an example of what progressive politicians are calling a “fair transition” — funds and policies to help workers who are laid off when the government cracks down on fossil fuels. In the U.S., supporters of a “Green New Deal” have already called for a similar fair transition package aimed at American coal workers. Antonio Gomez Souto, a 43-year-old miner who’s worked at the La Escondida coal mine since he was 17, said that for him at least, the deal was adequate. “I'm part of a pre-retirement plan for this year,” he said after his last Monday shift at the mine. “Pre-retirement packages are enough to get by and stop worrying about it.” Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo
Views: 127356 VICE News
Oral History, Coal Mining in West Virginia
 
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This is a project for American History at NorthPoint Bible College
Views: 1900 Christopher T
When British Coal Was King - BBC Mining Part 1
 
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Timeshift explores the lost world of coal mining and the extraordinarily rich social and cultural lives of those who worked in what was once Britain's most important industry. It's a story told through a largely forgotten film archive that movingly documents the final years of coal's heyday from the 1940s to the 1980s. One priceless piece of footage features a ballet performance by tutu-wearing colliers. Featuring contributions from those who worked underground, those who lived in the pit villages, those who filmed them at work and at play and those - like Billy Elliot writer Lee Hall - who have been inspired by what made coalfield culture so unique. Narrated by Christopher Eccleston
Views: 53932 ModifiedMethod
A Brief History of Coal Mining
 
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We briefly explain the history of coal. From the cave man days, to present day. For more information on coal, and the debate of whether it is a logical energy source please visit: http://www.advantagesanddisadvantagesofcoal.com/
Views: 7169 coaldebate
Centralia Burning Ghost Town - Pennsylvania USA
 
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Centralia, Pennsylvania was nearly entirely evacuated following a coal mine fire, burning beneath the town since 1962. Centralia’s fire started in 1962, when residents turned an old strip mine into a dump, and setting the rubbish alight. The fire spread through an unsealed opening to the underground coal mines, igniting a seam of coal, and the fire has been burning to this day. In 1992, Pennsylvania condemned the town and claimed it under eminent domain in an attempt for force the remaining residents out. Some sued, and were allowed to stay. A section of State Route 61 was abandoned after it began to buckle and crumble from the underground fire. The fire stretches 12km, and burns underneath an area of 15 square kilometres, 300 feet below ground, authorities say the fire could burn for another 250 years. The town now mostly attracts tourists who visit an abandoned highway, where many profanities and obscene pictures are spray painted onto it, over time the highway has earned the nickname Graffiti Highway. Centralia is rumored to have inspired Silent Hill. Thanks for watching ____________________________________________________________________ CREDIT LINKS ► Joey Underground Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/user/kurtishamilton1986 ► Abandoned Town of Centralia - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TNYN3rEBws ► ABANDONED_PA Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xw8JkFvrKJY ► ABANDONED_PA Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xw8JkFvrKJY ____________________________________________________________________ ► Wonder World Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/wonderworld.ytc.10 ► Wonder World Twitter - https://twitter.com/WonderWorld_YTC For business enquiries, content submission or copyright concerns or disputes, please contact us at [email protected]
Views: 2306310 Wonder World
Coal Mining in Appalachia
 
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This video is about Coal Mining via Mountain Top Removal. Appalachian Coal Mining See how coal is mined in the Appalachian Mountains via Mountain Top Removal. This 30 minute video takes you inside a giant dragline and tells the whole story from blasting the rock to transporting the coal by rail. See Elk enjoying the reclaimed land. I started this project in 2002.
Views: 379289 Gary Smith
Kellingley Colliery: Britain's last coal mine closes
 
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A million men used to toil beneath the ground. Coal-mining fuelled the industrial revolution and brought about the biggest industrial dispute of the last fifty years. Now Britain's last deep coal mine, Kellingley Colliery in Yorkshire, has closed. Subscribe for more like this, every day: http://bit.ly/1epe41j Dangerous world: http://bit.ly/1JCsSYb The news explained: http://bit.ly/1epgay4 Music: http://bit.ly/1RVTRNy Technology: http://bit.ly/1LI1K9y Like us on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1wQ1Gty Follow us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1mFUjBD
Views: 29927 Channel 4 News
Spain's Plan to Quit the Coal Industry Explained | NowThis World
 
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Climate change is happening. And one industry in particular will have to undergo a huge transformation and all but disappear by 2050…. The coal industry. » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe » Watch the Previous Episode: https://go.nowth.is/2TVSSsk But what does this mean for that industry and governments around the world? And what about the workers the coal industry employs? We’re taking a look at the steps one country is taking to prepare for a clean energy economy, while trying to make sure no one gets left behind. To avoid the most devastating consequences of climate change, a United Nations panel of scientists has recently warned that drastic action is required around the world. In Spain. Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez government's priorities was taking immediate action to address climate change. That meant drastic action to limit Spain’s coal industry. The country had to comply with a European Union directive that said that public funds could no longer be used to keep unprofitable coal mines open. This meant that those mines had to be shut down by the end of 2018. And that is exactly what happened. By December of 2018, roughly three out of four of Spain’s coal miners clocked out of work for the last time. Spain’s socialist government cut a deal with several affiliated miner’s unions, referred to as the ‘Just Transition’ deal.” So we’re taking a look at the innovative steps Spain is taking to prepare for a clean energy economy, while trying to make sure no one gets left behind. Check out the video for the full report. Connect with NowThis » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like us on Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/News_Facebook » Tweet us on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/News_Twitter » Follow us on Instagram: http://go.nowth.is/News_Instagram » Find us on Snapchat Discover: http://go.nowth.is/News_Snapchat Connect with Judah: » Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetJudah » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Alex: » Follow @AlexLJanin on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetAlex » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeAlex Connect with Versha: » Follow @versharma on Twitter: http://go.nowth.is/TweetVersha » Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld
Views: 52183 NowThis World
Appalachia coal mining history
 
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Appalachia coal mining history fascinating: early days, dangerous tunnel in the ground. Latter day with heavy machinery, whole mountains are leveled to get to the coal. True, it's very hard on the landscape, but a lot easier on the miners.
Views: 2548 Steve Close
Fully Mechanized Longwall Coal Production
 
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Fully mechanized Longwall Coal Production
Views: 270631 mining videos
World's biggest mine: Inside US coal
 
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Barack Obama’s pledge to cut carbon emissions has not stopped North Antelope Rochelle mine in Wyoming. In fact, production is booming - and climate change is off the agenda. The Guardian's Suzanne Goldenberg gets a rare look inside the biggest coal mine in the world. Subscribe to The Guardian ► http://bit.ly/subscribegdn Get the whole picture ► http://bit.ly/guardianhome ENDBOARD VIDEOS The godless church and the atheists taking the US by storm ► http://bit.ly/GodlessChurch US Democracy doesn't work in this slice of Florida ► http://bit.ly/1EuRyMz GUARDIAN PLAYLISTS Guardian Investigations ► http://bit.ly/gdninvestigations Comment is Free ► http://bit.ly/CIFplaylist Guardian Docs ► http://bit.ly/gdndocs Guardian Animations & Explanations ► http://bit.ly/aninandex Other Guardian channels on YouTube: Guardian Football ► https://www.youtube.com/user/guardianfootball Guardian Music ► https://www.youtube.com/guardianmusic Guardian Membership ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianMembership Guardian Food ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianFood Guardian Culture ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianCultureArts Guardian Tech ► THE GUARDIAN'S TOP 10 VIDEOS Mos Def force fed in Gitmo procedure ► http://bit.ly/1hdvoqM Bangladeshi Sex Workers take steroids ► http://bit.ly/1mqf3fA North Korean military parade in slow-mo ► http://bit.ly/TTEAGk Police assault on Ian Tomlinson at G20 ► http://bit.ly/1rgq6Pg Manny Pacquiao fight highlights ► http://bit.ly/RBczBp Brick-by-brick women's fencing protest ► http://bit.ly/RBcEFc Trouserless on the Tube ► http://bit.ly/SPWOrv Jesus "would have been an atheist" ► http://bit.ly/1kfrKqP Open Heart Surgery ► http://bit.ly/1tPaGQ2 Brick-by-Brick Usain Bolt 2012 Olympic gold ► http://bit.ly/1pxQqQv
Views: 204068 The Guardian
The Long Street (The History of Rhondda Coal Mining)
 
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Vincent Kane presents the classic serial on the history of coal in the Rhondda. A rare archive of black and white documentary footage, made around 1965. This includes the first 3 of 4 episodes. Episode 4 (Today and Tomorrow) has been uploaded by John Smith and can be viewed on his channel (Thanks John!!!!!) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXhpBjaSaFg Thanks to Craig (Och) who recorded this on VHS tape over 20 years ago. For non-commercial research and private study only.
Views: 2087 ZOOT1000100
Cursed by Coal: Mining the Navajo Nation
 
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There's a resource curse on the Navajo Nation. The 27,000-square-mile reservation straddling parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah has an extremely high abundance of many energy resources — particularly coal. That coal is what's burned to provide much of the Southwest with electricity, and it creates jobs for the Navajo. But the mining and burning have also caused environmental degradation, serious health issues, and displacement. VICE News travels to the Navajo Nation to find out how its abundance of coal is affecting the future of the Navajo people. Watch “Toxic: Coal Ash” - http://bit.ly/1zDaW66 Watch “Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City” - http://bit.ly/1E2YejO Read "Line 61, the Oil Pipeline That Will Dwarf Keystone XL” - http://bit.ly/18iOKad Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 197944 VICE News
Hard Coal.  Pennsylvania Anthracite coal mining history. The complete vdieo
 
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Video made by volunteers Van Wagner, Mark Temple, and miners from the Pioneer coal mine in Ashland PA.
Views: 105 vanwags
The Coal Vote: Showdown in West Virginia's Midterm Elections
 
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Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News This year's midterm elections are projected to be the most expensive in American history. One of the most notable races, where outside interests are pouring in millions of dollars, is in West Virginia's third district — and the campaign is centered on one thing: coal. The coal industry has dominated West Virginia for the past 150 years, exerting great influence over its economy and politics. Obama’s push to drastically reduce carbon emissions to combat climate change has convinced many West Virginians that the federal government is waging a “war on coal” and, in turn, on West Virginia, as mines close and jobs are cut. The backlash has placed 19-term Democratic incumbent Nick Rahall under fire for his perceived affiliation with Obama. The Koch brothers and other out-of-state energy interests have seized this opportunity to oust Rahall, leading Democratic State Senator Evan Jenkins to switch parties and run as a Republican. VICE News traveled to West Virginia's third district to cover the race between the two candidates as they fight to prove who will be coal's greatest champion, and spoke with locals about coal's outsized importance in the region. Check out "Voters In Colorado and Kansas Are Tuning Out This Year's Election" - http://bit.ly/1rE4mHB Check out "Environmental Groups Target Key Midterm Fight For North Carolina Senate Seat" - http://bit.ly/1wK2X6H Check out "Get Ready For More False Claims By Big Polluters" - http://bit.ly/1G0bLvq Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
Views: 143506 VICE News
Coal, Steam, and The Industrial Revolution: Crash Course World History #32
 
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Mongols Shirts and Crash Course Posters! http://store.dftba.com/collections/crashcourse In which John Green wraps up revolutions month with what is arguably the most revolutionary of modern revolutions, the Industrial Revolution. While very few leaders were beheaded in the course of this one, it changed the lives of more people more dramatically than any of the political revolutions we've discussed. So, why did the Industrial Revolution happen around 1750 in the United Kingdom? Coal. Easily accessible coal, it turns out. All this, plus you'll finally learn the difference between James Watt and Thomas Newcomen, and will never again be caught telling people that your blender has a 900 Newcomen motor. Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! http://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-world-history-the-complete-series-dvd-set Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @raoulmeyer @crashcoursestan @saysdanica @thoughtbubbler Like us! ‪http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Follow us again! ‪http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 4305913 CrashCourse
What Coal Mining Hydrogeology tells us about the Real Risks of Fracking_London Lecture_May 2016
 
01:30:21
Development of shale gas by hydraulic fracturing (‘fracking’) is opposed by campaigners who hypothesise (amongst other things) that potable ground water supplies could be polluted by upward migration of fractures and any fluids they contain. There are very strong reasons for doubting this hypothesis, not least because migration of fractures to prolific aquifers would be highly unlikely to lead to pollution, but almost certain to result in drowning of the shale gas wells, rendering them unusable. Hence, despite having contrasting motivations, shale gas developers and environmental guardians turn out to have a strong common interest in avoiding inter-connection to aquifers. There is in fact a century-long analogue for such a ‘confluence’ of interests, provided by the history of longwall coal mining beneath the sea and major aquifers. Where large-scale mining proceeded from the surface downwards, major hydraulic inter-connection of shallow and deep zones did indeed result in widespread water pollution. However, where new mines were developed at depth without any connections to shallow old workings), complete hydraulic isolation from the near-surface hydrogeological environment was successfully maintained. This was despite the fact that longwall mining produced far greater stratal disruption than shale gas fracking ever could. A detailed example is presented from the successful operation of the Selby Coalfield beneath one of the UK’s main aquifers. This profound and sustained historical analogue provides a very clear lesson: given the lack of hydrogeological connectivity to shallow aquifers, shale gas fracking per se cannot contaminate shallow ground water. Provided operators observe long-established laws governing hydrocarbon wells and associated surface operations, other hydrogeological risks will also be minimal. Opponents of shale gas developments should therefore focus attention on more realistic potential impacts, most of which are familiar from almost any planning application, such as increased truck traffic on minor roads. Speaker Biography Paul Younger (University of Glasgow) Paul L Younger FREng holds the Rankine Chair of Engineering and is Professor of Energy Engineering at the University of Glasgow. He was formerly Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Engagement at Newcastle University, where he also established and led the Sir Joseph Swan Institute for Energy Research and, subsequently, the Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability. A geologist by first degree, Paul trained in hydrogeology in the USA as a Harkness Fellow in the mid-1980s, subsequently developing a career in environmental engineering. He is perhaps best known for his research and outreach on the environmental management of water in active and abandoned mines worldwide, which won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher Education for Newcastle University in 2005. He is a Fellow of the Geological Society and a Chartered Geologist, as well as a Chartered Engineer. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2007 and has received honorary doctorates for his mine water pollution work from leading universities in Spain and South America. His current research focuses on deep geothermal. In parallel with his mainstream academic work, Paul has founded and directed four companies in the water and energy sectors and has authored more than 400 items in the international literature, including the well-received books “Mine Water: Hydrology, pollution, remediation” (Kluwer, 2002), “Groundwater in the Environment: An Introduction” (Blackwell, 2007), “Water: all that matters” (Hodder, 2012) and “Energy: all that matters” (Hodder, 2014). His knowledge of shale gas was gained through serving on the Joint Royal Academies’ Expert Panel, which reported to the UK government in 2012, and on the Independent Expert Panel on Unconventional Gas, which reported to the Scottish Government in June 2014. When not otherwise engaged, Paul’s preferred activities include exploring the Scottish Highlands and Islands, singing and playing traditional music, and indulging his love of the Spanish and Gaelic languages and cultures. Website: www.geolsoc.org.uk Twitter: www.twitter.com/geolsoc
Views: 4048 GeologicalSociety
Springhill Mining Disaster
 
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Support BDHQ http://www.patreon.com/baddayhq The 1958 bump, which occurred on October 23, 1958, was the most severe "bump" (underground earthquake) in North American mining history. The 1958 bump devastated the people of Springhill for the casualties they suffered; it also devastated the town, as the coal industry had been its economic lifeblood. After five and a half days (therefore around the morning of Wednesday, October 29, 1958), contact was established with a group of 12 survivors on the other side of a 160-foot (49 m) rockfall. A rescue tunnel was dug; it broke through to the trapped miners at 2:25 am on Thursday, October 30, 1958. Having a bad day? I bet we have worse ones for you. Sound off in the comments on your thoughts and what you'd like to see next! SUBSCRIBE today to get the latest true crime and disaster documentaries delivered to you weekly! All content is copyright of Partners in Motion INC. Join us on social media: https://www.facebook.com/partnersinmotion/?view_public_for=1003857803032519 https://twitter.com/PartnersHarmony https://plus.google.com/u/0/109232389902601257458 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Want to survive a real disaster or enhance a camping trip? Support Bad Day HQ by ordering some of our personally selected products: Best selling SAS Survival guide: https://goo.gl/IUms75 72-Hour emergency survival kit: https://goo.gl/FLkEOh LifeStraw portable water filter: https://goo.gl/hzBOz0 BioLite dual wood burning stove and USB charger: https://goo.gl/X8mDXK
Views: 50523 Bad Day HQ
Coal mining history of the Sandy Run watershed Renovo PA by Van Wagner
 
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I created this program to share with members of my hunting camp. I am far from an expert. I'm just a local former coal miner who finds this history fascinating. This is my best explanation of the what, where, and when regarding bituminous coal mining in the Renovo area.
Views: 318 vanwags
Huge Abandoned Coal Mine with Cart Roller Coaster!
 
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Use the link http://www.audible.com/properpeople or text code properpeople to 500-500 get a free audiobook, 2 free Audible Originals, and a 30-day free trial. In this episode we're checking out one of the most fascinating abandoned industrial sites we've ever encountered- the surface works of a huge German coal mine. Inside were tons of interesting sights to behold, including massive machine rooms and a loop of mine cart track that reminded us of a roller coaster! Most of the music in our videos comes from Epidemic Sound: http://share.epidemicsound.com/properpeople http://theproperpeople.com JOIN US ON: http://facebook.com/theproperpeople http://twitter.com/theproperpeople http://instagram.com/theproperpeople https://www.reddit.com/r/theproperpeople https://discord.gg/theproperpeople Enjoying our videos? Help us make more by buying a print: http://theproperpeople.com/shop Supporting us on Patreon: http://patreon.com/theproperpeople Purchasing a t-shirt: http://theproperpeople.com/merch Or shopping through our Amazon affiliate link: https://www.amazon.com/?tag=thepropeo0d-20 #abandoned #urbanexploration #industrial
Views: 117646 The Proper People
Anthracite Coal Mining Pennsylvania - A Day in the Life of a Coal Miner
 
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A vintage silent film depicting a day in the life of a Pennsylvania Anthracite Coal miner.
Views: 20805 Jim Roberts