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Ep.38  Return to PIONEER COAL - Unburied Mine Tunnels
 
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EPISODE 37: An unexpected wintertime explore... returning to the Pioneer Open Pit Coal Mine in Stellarton, to see what has changed since Episode 19. More 100-200 year old tunnels have been exposed by mining operations ... (MORE INFO BELOW) We are a group of Abandoned Mine explorers in Nova Scotia. Abandoned Mine Hunting is somewhat of a cross between the hobby of urban exploration, caving (spelunking), and history enthusiast. If this is your kind of thing, be sure to subscribe so you will always be informed of each new episode. IF YOU KNOW OF AN ABANDONED MINE IN ATLANTIC CANADA, we'd love to hear from you. Send a private message. We may just come and do an explore and episode featuring your site ! ** BEST VIEWED using the YouTube app on a full size SmartTV ** SPECIAL NOTE: While this type of exploration is almost always kilometers back in deep forest, it cannot always be guaranteed that the land we are hiking is public (Crown). These forgotten old mines/claims are almost always over 100 years old. It is also common that most mine workings have some kind of natural cave-in covering their mouth, after nearly a century of erosion. So some explores may involve preparation of clearing that cave-in, and/or dealing with letting spring water (flooding) out of the adits. These facts, along with the inherent danger of abandoned mines, force us to remain anonymous. We are responsible for our own risks & actions (not yours), but be clear we are not promoting this activity. Only showing you what we do. As with any typical Urban Exploration type channel, our faces and commentary will always be masked. If you are seeing an Episode, it means we are already weeks or month(s) finished with that site and never going back. The delay is intentional, as nothing shown here will be in realtime. It cannot be stressed enough - abandoned mines or mine sites can pose a ton of lethal threats. *We are not kids looking for kicks* Keep in mind that our group is made up of responsible adults, each with specific skills, and cross-Canada experience with over 100+ mine walks. Most 10 times larger and deeper than will ever be found in Nova Scotia! Specific research is always done beforehand. Required equipment and backups are a must. While it is indeed possible to safely explore an abandoned mine, DO NOT ENTER A MINE without being experienced, or going with an experienced explorer. If you don't know what you're doing, STAY OUT STAY ALIVE is the best policy. #ExploringAbandonedMines #MineExploring #AbandonedMines
Ep.5 COOK's BROOK Abandoned IRON MINE No.1 East
 
10:19
EPISODE 5: A full underground explore of a 700 foot abandoned Iron Mine adit on Cook's Brook (Londonderry NS). We are a group of Abandoned Mine explorers in Nova Scotia, who will be bringing you highlights of our underground adventures. (MORE INFO BELOW) Abandoned Mine Hunting is somewhat of a cross between the hobby of urban exploration, caving (spelunking), and history enthusiast. If this is your kind of thing, be sure to subscribe so you will always be informed of each new episode. IF YOU KNOW OF AN ABANDONED MINE, we'd love to hear from you. Send a private message. We may just come and do an explore and episode featuring your site ! Future episodes will involve everything from the smallest discoveries, to deep underground explores. ** Please be sure to watch in 720p60 HD ** We shoot and publish in 60 frames per second, taking advantage of YouTube's new 720p60 offering. SPECIAL NOTE: While this type of exploration is almost always kilometers back in deep forest, it cannot always be guaranteed that the land we are hiking is public (Crown). These forgotten old mines/claims are almost always over 100 years old. It is also common that most mine workings have some kind of natural cave-in covering their mouth, after nearly a century of erosion. So some explores may involve preparation of clearing that cave-in, and/or dealing with letting spring water (flooding) out of the adits. These facts, along with the inherent danger of abandoned mines, force us to remain anonymous. We are responsible for our own risks & actions (not yours), but be clear we are not promoting this activity. Only showing you what we do. As with any typical Urban Exploration type channel, our faces and commentary will always be masked. If you are seeing an Episode, it means we are already month(s) finished with that site and never going back. The delay is intentional, as nothing shown here will be in realtime. It cannot be stressed enough - abandoned mines can pose a ton of lethal threats. *We are not kids looking for kicks* Keep in mind that our group is made up of responsible adults, each with specific skills, and cross-Canada experience with over 75+ mine walks. Most 10 times larger and deeper than will ever be found in Nova Scotia! Specific research is always done beforehand. Required equipment and backups are a must. While it is indeed possible to safely spelunk an abandoned mine, DO NOT ENTER A MINE without being experienced, or going with an experienced explorer. If you don't know what you're doing, STAY OUT STAY ALIVE is the best policy.
Cape Breton University Launch of Zero Tuition Canada National Campaign
 
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On March 5, 2015, Cape Breton University President, David Wheeler; Cape Breton University Faculty Association President, Scott Stewart; and Cape Breton University Students’ Union President, Brandon Ellis united to launch a campaign calling for a national dialogue on tuition-free higher education in Canada.
Academy of Holy Angels: A History
 
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An adaptation of the book by Steve Werle titled, "Academy of Holy Angels: A History.
The Wildlife of the Far North
 
01:25
This a video dedicated to and made about the Wildlife of the Far North! Please rate and comment!
Views: 230 jh82296
The life of a drug addict
 
28:21
In this video, we revisit a good friend of mine who was first featured on AfterPrisonShow over a year ago. This friend of mine suffers from a very bad drug addiction. I hope this video serves as an eye opening experience to those who watch this. Show some love and Sub to the channel..!!! Why I went to prison FULL STORY: https://youtu.be/7ECgj1NzG_8 WRITE TO AFTERPRISONSHOW Po Box 6113 Chesapeake Va. 23323 https://www.facebook.com/afterprison Instagram: joepguerrero Twitter: @joepguerrero SnapChat: AfterPrisonShow PSN: joepguerrero Patreon.com/AfterPrisonShow For business inquiries: [email protected]
Views: 2606961 AfterPrisonShow
Mining and Railroads
 
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Chapter 13_Section 1_Mining and Railroads
Views: 167 Andrew Leighton
BEST CLIFF JUMPING SPOT EVER!
 
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My first vlog shorter than 10 minutes in awhile haha, gonna focus on making my videos as good as possible so if they aren't long I probably wont drag them out..... Thanks for watching:D Dierk Dockers is how u spell his name :) Don't forget to leave a LIKE and SUBSCRIBE - http://bit.ly/subTannerBraungardt - if you enjoyed! Also, SHARE with your friends! WATCH MORE: TRAMPOLINE VS - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfISKSyDz8gy8BRM1-OBoLKl92z_xfQ6g CHALLENGES - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfISKSyDz8gxitc78S6EFA7-WpklbHP_B LATEST - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfISKSyDz8gxRFITdSH-lpVGQ1Pnc0YXl FOLLOW ME: Instagram: https://instagram.com/tannerbraungardt/ Snapchat: http://snapchat.com/add/tanner_b24 Twitter: https://twitter.com/braungardtanner Facebook: https://facebook.com/tannerbraungardt/ Official Merch: http://www.tbraungardt.com/shop.html Business Inquiries: [email protected] FAN MAIL ADDRESS: Tanner Braungardt P.O. Box 98 Augusta, KS 67010 Skybound's Amazon: http://amzn.to/2bWpQlc SkyBound Stratos - 10% Off Use Code: TANNER10 http://bit.ly/2cOikfQ SkyBoundUSA.com - http://bit.ly/2cr7QSl Outro music: Zara Larsson - Ain't My Fault (R3hab Remix) If you've read all of this I love you -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1484706 Tanner Braungardt
Rita MacNeil Working Man
 
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*******NOTE: I WILL NOT TOLERATE ANYMORE VULGAR AND DISRESPECTFUL COMMENTS, AND FIGHTING BETWEEN USERS. IF THIS CONTINUES I WILL TURN THE COMMENT FEATURE OFF ON ALL VIDEOS******** Rita MacNeil sings her hit song Working Man RIP Rita MacNeil 1944-2013
Views: 780016 sirrussellott
Plowing my road with my Oshkosh.
 
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1963 Oshkosh M4819 plowing my road to my back field. The last part of the video I headed out across 2' + of virgin snow. Could have easily kept going.
Views: 46398 Alan Greene
Utah Stonehenge
 
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Between Delta and Fillmore exists this structure dating back to 1923. I have heard it was going to be a wind turbine / wind farm, but was abandoned. The trail to the top is a bit sketchy, more so with snow on the ground. It was a cold day, but it was an awesome day!
Views: 241 James King
Insights 2010: Peter Buchanan-Smith
 
01:17:59
Peter Buchanan-Smith is a New Yorkbased designer, author, and entrepreneur whose career has included designing book jackets for Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux; art direction of the New York Times Op-Ed page; creative direction for Paper magazine; and work for fashion icon Isaac Mizrahi, musical legends David Byrne, Brian Eno, Philip Glass, and the band Wilco. He is the author of several books, including The Wilco Book, and he has collaborated on many others, including Strunk and Whites classic The Elements of Style with illustrator Maira Kalman, and Muhammad Ali by Magnum Photographers. His first tome, Speck: A Curious Collection of Uncommon Things—which originated as a thesis project at the School of Visual Arts, where he also teaches—explores the fascinating lives of ordinary people and commonplace objects. This connection between people and objects is also at the heart of Buchanan-Smiths latest venture, Best Made Co., a purveyor of bespoke axes that offers not only a finely crafted tool but an entrée into the symbolic world conjured by the object and summoned by its owner (adventure, hard work, balance, and so on).
Views: 26314 Walker Art Center
Northern Gael performing in Buhl, MN, March 2015
 
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Laura MacKenzie, Danielle Enblom, and Ross Sutter performing at the Buhl MN Library in March of 2015
Views: 173 Mary Lofgren
Religion in American History: Moments of Crisis & Opportunity
 
02:01:56
As part of the annual meeting of the Library's Scholars Council, a panel of noted historians discussed the affect of religion and religious beliefs during moments of crisis and opportunity in American history. Speaker Biography: John Witte is is the Robert W. Woodruff Professor of Law, McDonald Distinguished Professor and director of the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University. He is a specialist in legal history, marriage law and religious liberty. Witte's writings have appeared in 12 languages, and he has lectured and convened conferences in North America, Western and Eastern Europe, Japan, Israel, Australia, Hong Kong and South Africa. With major funding from the Pew, Ford, Lilly, Luce and McDonald foundations, he has directed 12 major international research projects on democracy, human rights and religious liberty, and on marriage, family and children. Witte is a past holder of the Kluge Center's Cary and Ann Maguire Chair in Ethics and American History. Speaker Biography: Sarah Barringer Gordon, the Arlin M. Adams Professor of Constitutional Law and Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, is an expert on religion in American public life and the law of church and state, especially how religious liberty developed over the course of American history. She is a frequent commentator in news media on the constitutional law of religion and debates about religious freedom. Her current book project, "Freedom's Holy Light: Disestablishment in America, 1776-1876," is about the historical relationships among religion, politics and law. Speaker Biography: Peter Manseau is the Lilly Endowment Curator of American Religious History at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History. He is the author of six books, including the memoir "Vows," the novel "Songs for the Butcher's Daughter," the travelogue "Rag and Bone," and the retelling of America's diverse spiritual formation "One Nation, Under Gods." Manseau is the winner of the National Jewish Book Award, the American Library Association's Sophie Brody Medal for Outstanding Achievement in Jewish Literature, the Ribalow Prize for Fiction and a 2012 National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship. Speaker Biography: Ted Widmer is director of the John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress and the author or editor of many works of American history, including "The New York Times Disunion: A History of the Civil War," "Listening In: The Secret White House Tape Recordings of John F. Kennedy," "Ark of the Liberties: America and the World" and "American Speeches, Martin Van Buren and Young America: The Flowering of Democracy in New York City." For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=7913
Views: 2179 LibraryOfCongress
Post-Confederation Canada (1867–1914) | Wikipedia audio article
 
35:47
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Post-Confederation Canada (1867–1914) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Post-Confederation Canada (1867–1914) is the history of a new nation from its formation to the outbreak of World War I in 1914. Canada had a population of 3.5 million, residing in the large expanse from Cape Breton to just beyond the Great Lakes, usually within a hundred miles or so of the Canada–US border. One in three Canadians was French, and about 100,000 were aboriginal (First Nation, Inuit, Métis). It was a rural country composed of small farms. With a population of 115,000, Montreal was the largest city, followed by Toronto and Quebec at about 60,000. Pigs roamed the muddy streets of Ottawa, the small new national capital. Besides subsistence agriculture, the economy was based on exports of lumber, fish and grain, and the import of investment capital from London and New York. Factories were small, except for those making farm implements. Overall the economy prospered in the first years of Confederation, but a world-wide depression 1873-1896 severely hurt the export economy, reduced the inflow of foreign capital, and reduced the flow of immigration. Economic growth of total GNP (in constant dollars) averaged only 2.4 percent per year, 1870 to 1896, then surged to 6.2 percent, 1897-1913. Part of that increase was due to population growth. The rate of growth of GNP per capita was 1.3% , 1870 to 1896, then surged to 2.6 percent, 1897-1913. The growth rate was respectable, but lower than that of the United States, and fueled a sense of disappointment that Confederation had not delivered on its promise of prosperity. Politically, the Father of Confederation, John A. Macdonald (1815 – 1891) and his Conservative Party ("Tories") dominated national politics until his death (with one interruption). The Liberals ("Grits") under Wilfrid Laurier (1841-1919) were in power 1896 to 1911, and then were ousted in a campaign based on anti-Americanism by Robert Borden.Francophones had a distinct and traditionalistic culture, led by the landholders and the priests. The Anglophones took pride in their Britishness and in their refusal to be swallowed up by the United States. Baseball and lacrosse were favorite sports. Cultural facilities were limited. There were only two public libraries in the entire new country; half the adults in Quebec could not read. Hard drinking in all ranks was the norm; in fact, the new prime minister, John A. Macdonald, was sometimes drunk in public. Politically, the new nation was defined by its practicality, realism, and stoicism; it had little interest in theory or aesthetics. Much more important was loyalty to family, church, political party, and Queen Victoria. Historians later emphasized the iconic phrase "Peace, Order and Good Government" ("paix, ordre et bon gouvernement") as founding constitutional principles, but at the time it was rarely quoted.On the eve of the great war in 1914, the national population had reached 8.1 million. Most of the growth had taken place in the new western provinces, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia, while immigration from abroad reached 400,000 annually. The great national achievement was the building of transcontinental railways that opened the prairies to settlement. The rich new farmlands made Canada a major exporter of wheat. Issues of nationalism versus loyalty to the British Crown continued. So too did increasingly bitter disputes on language issues, especially the role of the French language outside Québec. Ethno-religious tensions flared between the Francophones and the Anglophones, between the Catholic Irish ("greens") and the Protestant Irish ("Orange"), and between the whites and the Asians on the West Coast.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
An abandoned mine near the centre of Canada
 
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On the way to the geographic centre of Canada, located in remote Nunavut, Maclean’s had to stop at an abandoned mineral exploration camp near a water body called Ferguson Lake. The camp was abandoned by Starfield Resources in 2005, which left its equipment and junk behind to avoid the cost of shipping it out. Abandoned or “orphaned” mines are a common phenomenon in the Canadian north, costing taxpayers an estimated $2.4 billion to clean up. Here is what one looks like. Click here to subscribe to Maclean's on YouTube: http://bit.ly/macleanssubscribe Check out our full video catalogue: http://bit.ly/macleansvideos Videos, stories, interactives, charts, and more: http://www.macleans.ca Sign up for our Archives, a digitized collection of more than a century of magazines: http:///www.macleans.ca/archives Download Maclean's Daily App for mobile and tablet: http://bit.ly/macleansapp Like Maclean's on Facebook: http://fb.com/macleans Follow Maclean's on Twitter: http://twitter.com/macleansmag Follow Maclean's on Flipboard: https://flipboard.com/@MacleansMag Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/macleansmag/ Check out our Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/macleansmag/
Views: 117 Maclean's
Sept. 6, 2018 - House of Assembly Proceedings
 
01:59:44
Guidelines for Use The Speaker of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly grants permission to record and use the audio and video of the proceedings of the Assembly and its committees for educational and research purposes and as provided below. The video may only be used with its original audio component and no other audio or video material may be added to audio or video material used. Television and radio broadcasters may use recorded excerpts of the proceedings in their news or public affairs programs in balanced, fair and accurate reports of proceedings. Neither the audio nor the video may be used for political party advertising, election campaigns or any other politically partisan activity except that members of the House of Assembly may, for the purpose of serving their constituents, make use of recorded excerpts of the proceedings on their websites or on social media if not presented in a misleading manner and if a link is provided to the full proceeding. Neither the audio nor the video may be used in any edited form that could mislead or misinform an audience or viewer or that does not present a balanced portrayal of the proceedings in the House. The audio and video may not be used in court, or before a tribunal or other body, for the purpose of questioning, commenting upon or making judgement upon the proceedings in the House. Any other use or rebroadcast or webcast of these proceedings requires the express written approval of the Speaker.
Post-Confederation Canada (1867–1914) | Wikipedia audio article
 
35:47
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Post-Confederation Canada (1867–1914) Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Post-Confederation Canada (1867–1914) is the history of a new nation from its formation to the outbreak of World War I in 1914. Canada had a population of 3.5 million, residing in the large expanse from Cape Breton to just beyond the Great Lakes, usually within a hundred miles or so of the Canada–US border. One in three Canadians was French, and about 100,000 were aboriginal (First Nation, Inuit, Métis). It was a rural country composed of small farms. With a population of 115,000, Montreal was the largest city, followed by Toronto and Quebec at about 60,000. Pigs roamed the muddy streets of Ottawa, the small new national capital. Besides subsistence agriculture, the economy was based on exports of lumber, fish and grain, and the import of investment capital from London and New York. Factories were small, except for those making farm implements. Overall the economy prospered in the first years of Confederation, but a world-wide depression 1873-1896 severely hurt the export economy, reduced the inflow of foreign capital, and reduced the flow of immigration. Economic growth of total GNP (in constant dollars) averaged only 2.4 percent per year, 1870 to 1896, then surged to 6.2 percent, 1897-1913. Part of that increase was due to population growth. The rate of growth of GNP per capita was 1.3% , 1870 to 1896, then surged to 2.6 percent, 1897-1913. The growth rate was respectable, but lower than that of the United States, and fueled a sense of disappointment that Confederation had not delivered on its promise of prosperity. Politically, the Father of Confederation, John A. Macdonald (1815 – 1891) and his Conservative Party ("Tories") dominated national politics until his death (with one interruption). The Liberals ("Grits") under Wilfrid Laurier (1841-1919) were in power 1896 to 1911, and then were ousted in a campaign based on anti-Americanism by Robert Borden.Francophones had a distinct and traditionalistic culture, led by the landholders and the priests. The Anglophones took pride in their Britishness and in their refusal to be swallowed up by the United States. Baseball and lacrosse were favorite sports. Cultural facilities were limited. There were only two public libraries in the entire new country; half the adults in Quebec could not read. Hard drinking in all ranks was the norm; in fact, the new prime minister, John A. Macdonald, was sometimes drunk in public. Politically, the new nation was defined by its practicality, realism, and stoicism; it had little interest in theory or aesthetics. Much more important was loyalty to family, church, political party, and Queen Victoria. Historians later emphasized the iconic phrase "Peace, Order and Good Government" ("paix, ordre et bon gouvernement") as founding constitutional principles, but at the time it was rarely quoted.On the eve of the great war in 1914, the national population had reached 8.1 million. Most of the growth had taken place in the new western provinces, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia, while immigration from abroad reached 400,000 annually. The great national achievement was the building of transcontinental railways that opened the prairies to settlement. The rich new farmlands made Canada a major exporter of wheat. Issues of nationalism versus loyalty to the British Crown continued. So too did increasingly bitter disputes on language issues, especially the role of the French language outside Québec. Ethno-religious tensions flared between the Francophones and the Anglophones, between the Catholic Irish ("greens") and the Protestant Irish ("Orange"), and between the whites and the Asians on the West Coast.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Connections Live on the opioid epidemic in New York State
 
01:20:34
In this special edition of Connections, we address the opioid epidemic in New York State. In the first hour, local individuals living in recovery will share their journeys of hope and the challenges they've faced battling addiction. Our guests: • Brandon Scott, living in recovery for one year • Yana Khasper, co-founder of ROCovery Fitness, who is living in recovery • Sean Smith, co-founder of ROCovery Fitness, who is living in recovery In our second hour, local leaders in healthcare and law enforcement will provide an update on the state of the crisis in the Rochester and Finger Lakes region. Our guests: • Dr. Michael Mendoza, M.D., Monroe County Commissioner of Public Health • Jennifer Faringer, director of DePaul's National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence - Rochester Area • Todd Baxter, Monroe County Sheriff
Views: 87 WXXINews
Fight after Allure
 
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This video was uploaded from an Android phone.
Views: 40 2010brandonsmith
Marriage Equality Rally, Sydney, 25 May 2013
 
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Marriage Equality Rally, 25 May 2013. The rally began at Sydney's Town Hall and then continued in a march to Taylor Square, where LGBTI activists chalked a rainbow crossing. A painted rainbow crossing that had been there for Mardi Gras 2013 had been recently removed by the local council. Speakers at the rally include: Cat Rose, Karl Hand, April Holcombe, Irene Doutney.
Views: 401 kurvapicsa
The National for Wednesday, May 31, 2017
 
59:52
Welcome to the National, the flagship nightly newscast of CBC News, hosted by Peter Mansbridge. »»» Subscribe to The National to watch more videos here: https://www.youtube.com/user/CBCTheNational?sub_confirmation=1 Voice Your Opinion & Connect With Us Online: The National Updates on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thenational The National Updates on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CBCTheNational The National Updates on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CBCTheNational »»» »»» »»» »»» »»» The National is CBC Television's flagship news program. Airing seven days a week, the show delivers news, feature documentaries and analysis from some of Canada's leading journalists.
Views: 14452 CBC News: The National
CN Grand Narrows 03-17-92
 
07:37
Views: 453 Dave Hull
Burns Lake: More Than a Lifestyle
 
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Burns Lake: the heart of the Lakes District in Northwest British Columbia. Visit choose.burnslake.ca to discover the opportunities.
Views: 2368 Burns Lake, BC
SCR (ex Devco) GP38-2
 
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This was taken from the roof of Empire Theatres in Sydney. After switching a few hoppers this GP28-2 was going to pick up a visiting NBEC RS18U down for repairs.
Views: 1191 keiichi902
Halifax Nova Scotia Protest March Against Police Murdering of Mark Brown
 
08:54
These protests paid by George Soros. See complete report, speeches and photos http://canadiansituations.wordpress.com/2014/08/20/hands-up-dont-shoot-justice-4-mike-brown-in-halifax/
Views: 144 FolkPhotographer
Westmoreland Coal Train
 
01:15
Empty coal hoppers leaving the SaskPower plant heading to be reloaded at the coal mine in Coronach, Sk.
Views: 113 Nick Marcil
Alan Doyle | Appel Salon | October 16th 2017
 
01:04:33
"The things that would normally drag you to the bigger cities of your county didn't matter to me. I didn't have any of that."--Alan Doyle Author of the bestselling memoir, Where I Belong, Great Big Sea front man Alan Doyle discusses A Newfoundlander in Canada, his hilarious, heartwarming account of leaving Newfoundland and discovering Canada for the First time. In conversation with Stephen Brunt.
CFYK-TV 6pm News, February 27, 2009
 
59:15
Weeknight English-language newscast from the CBC owned station in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. Most of the few commercials in the broadcast were included. Posted for educational and historical purposes only. All material is under the copyright of their original holders. No copyright infringement is intended.
Views: 589 NewsActive3
Here & Now Tuesday April 17 2018
 
01:04:00
Here & Now - Every day, around Newfoundland and Labrador, Debbie Cooper, Anthony Germain, Ryan Snoddon, and the entire Here and Now team pull out all the stops to cover your news and weather. If it's happening now, you'll see it here. »»» Subscribe to CBC NL to watch more videos: https://www.youtube.com/c/cbcnl?sub_confirmation=1 For your daily CBC NL news fix: https://www.cbc.ca/nl CBC NL on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/cbcnl CBC NL on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cbcnl/ CBC NL is now on YouTube. Join us for news, live events, commentary, daily weather, comedy, music, more. Connect with us about what you'd like to see here.
2006 IL State Hog Rally Shotgun Charlie
 
06:32
My band Shotgun Charlie playing live at the IL State Hog Rally in Peoria,IL 2006, Rodney Haines, Kenny Radley, Scott Harms, Jim Tittle, Jim Vanderheydt
Views: 811 Jim Vanderheydt
Economic history of the United States | Wikipedia audio article | Wikipedia audio article
 
03:12:33
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Economic history of the United States | Wikipedia audio article Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The economic history of the United States is about characteristics of and important developments in the U.S. economy from colonial times to the present. The emphasis is on economic performance and how it was affected by new technologies, especially those that improved productivity, which is the main cause of economic growth. Also covered are the change of size in economic sectors and the effects of legislation and government policy. Specialized business history is covered in American business history.
Views: 32 wikipedia tts
Ice hockey
 
59:40
Ice hockey is a team sport played on ice in which two teams of skaters use sticks to shoot a hard rubber hockey puck into their opponent's net to score points. In some countries such as Canada, the United States, and some European countries such as Latvia and Sweden, it is often known simply as "hockey"; the name "ice hockey" is more used in countries where "hockey" generally refers to field hockey or both sports are almost as popular (such as South American, Asian, Australasian, and some European countries like Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and the United Kingdom). Ice hockey teams usually consists of four lines of three forwards, three pairs of defencemen, and two goalies. Five members of each team skate up and down the ice trying to take the puck and score a goal against the opposing team. Each team has a goaltender who tries to stop the puck from going into the goal. A fast-paced physical sport, hockey is most popular in areas of North America (particularly Canada and northern parts of the United States) and Europe. In North America, the National Hockey League (NHL) is the highest level for men's hockey and the most popular. Ice hockey is the official national winter sport of Canada, where the game enjoys immense popularity. Worldwide, there are ice hockey federations in 73 countries. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 70 Audiopedia
Canadian English | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:19:57
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Canadian English Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Canadian English (CanE, CE, en-CA) is the set of varieties of the English language native to Canada. According to the 2011 census, English was the first language of approximately 19 million Canadians, or 57% of the population; the remainder of the population were native speakers of Canadian French (22%) or other languages (allophones, 21%). A larger number, 28 million people, reported using English as their dominant language. 82% of Canadians outside the province of Quebec reported speaking English natively, but within Quebec the figure was just 7.7% as most of its residents are native speakers of Quebec French.Canadian English contains major elements of both British English and American English, as well as many uniquely Canadian characteristics. While, broadly speaking, Canadian English tends to be closest to American English in terms of linguistic distance, the precise influence of American English, British English and other sources on Canadian English varieties has been the ongoing focus of systematic studies since the 1950s.Phonologically, Canadian and American English are classified together as North American English, emphasizing the fact that the vast majority of outsiders, even other native English speakers, cannot distinguish the typical accents of the two countries by sound alone. There are minor disagreements over the degree to which even Canadians and Americans themselves can differentiate their own two accents, and there is even evidence that some Western American English (Pacific Northwest and California English, for example) is undergoing a vowel shift partially coinciding with the one first reported in mainland Canadian English in the early 1990s.
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Economic history of the United States | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Economic history of the United States 00:00:31 1 Colonial economy to 1780s 00:01:30 1.1 Demographics 00:03:32 1.2 The economy 00:07:14 1.2.1 New England 00:09:52 1.3 Urban centers 00:13:14 1.4 Political environment 00:13:23 1.4.1 Mercantilism: old and new 00:15:04 1.4.2 Free enterprise 00:16:20 1.4.3 Taxation 00:17:42 1.5 The American Revolution 00:23:41 2 The New Nation 00:26:03 2.1 Industry and commerce 00:26:12 2.1.1 Transportation 00:26:51 2.1.2 Automatic flour mill 00:27:23 2.1.3 Cotton gin 00:27:57 2.1.4 Mechanized textile manufacturing 00:29:35 2.2 Finance, money and banking 00:30:07 3 The early 19th century 00:31:00 3.1 Political developments 00:35:18 3.2 Agriculture, commerce and industry 00:35:28 3.2.1 Population growth 00:37:18 3.2.2 Labor shortage 00:38:09 3.2.3 Agriculture 00:40:15 3.2.4 Roads 00:41:56 3.2.5 Canals 00:43:48 3.2.6 Steam power 00:45:18 3.2.7 Mechanical power transmission 00:45:55 3.2.8 Shipbuilding 00:46:22 3.2.9 Steamboats and steam ships 00:48:17 3.2.10 Railroads 00:49:59 3.2.11 Manufacturing 00:53:16 3.2.11.1 Development of interchangeable parts 00:57:10 3.3 Finance, money and banking 01:01:04 3.3.1 Economics of the War of 1812 01:04:50 4 The mid 19th century 01:06:46 4.1 Commerce, industry and agriculture 01:07:04 4.1.1 Railroads 01:09:16 4.1.2 Iron industry 01:10:55 4.1.3 Coal displaces wood 01:12:23 4.1.4 Manufacturing 01:14:32 4.1.5 Steam power 01:15:39 4.1.6 Steamboats and ships 01:17:02 4.1.7 Telegraph 01:17:51 4.1.8 Urbanization 01:18:40 4.1.9 Agriculture 01:21:07 4.1.9.1 Slave labor 01:21:59 4.2 Finance, money and banking 01:23:22 4.2.1 Panic of 1857 01:25:44 4.3 Immigration surge 01:26:05 4.4 Collapse of the South 01:27:28 4.5 Political developments 01:28:30 4.5.1 Treasury 01:31:30 4.5.2 Land grants 01:34:44 4.5.3 Banking 01:35:18 4.5.4 Education 01:35:53 4.5.5 Civil War 01:37:30 5 Late 19th century 01:37:40 5.1 Commerce, industry and agriculture 01:40:04 5.1.1 Railroads 01:41:46 5.1.2 Steel 01:42:47 5.1.3 Electric lights and electric street railways 01:44:59 5.1.4 Communications 01:45:54 5.1.5 Modern business management 01:46:49 5.1.6 Agriculture 01:50:15 5.1.7 Oil, minerals and mining 01:50:24 5.1.7.1 Oil 01:54:27 5.1.7.2 Coal 01:54:40 5.1.7.3 Iron ore 01:55:05 5.1.8 Finance, money and banking 01:56:45 5.1.9 Water supply and sewers 01:57:13 5.1.10 Labor unions 01:57:50 5.1.11 Political developments 01:58:13 6 Early 20th century 01:58:23 6.1 Economic growth and the 1910 break 01:59:42 6.2 Industry, commerce and agriculture 02:00:19 6.2.1 Electrification 02:02:39 6.2.2 Manufacturing 02:05:14 6.2.3 Electric street railways 02:05:47 6.2.4 Electrochemicals 02:06:46 6.2.5 Railroads 02:07:50 6.2.6 Automobiles and trucks 02:08:46 6.2.7 Highway system 02:09:42 6.2.8 Water supply and sewers 02:10:41 6.2.9 Agriculture 02:11:46 6.2.10 Communications 02:11:54 6.2.10.1 Telephone 02:12:34 6.2.10.2 Radio 02:13:18 6.2.11 Finance, money and banking 02:15:30 6.3 Political developments 02:18:57 6.3.1 World War I 02:19:18 6.3.2 Roaring twenties: 1920–1929 02:20:39 6.4 Quality of life 02:21:58 7 From 1929 through World War II 02:22:09 7.1 Pre-war industry, commerce, and agriculture 02:22:43 7.1.1 Manufacturing 02:23:13 7.2 Great Depression: 1929–1941 02:24:27 7.2.1 Spending 02:24:30 7.2.2 Banking crisis 02:26:18 7.2.3 Unemployment 02:28:31 7.2.4 Relief 02:30:40 7.2.5 New Deal impact 02:33:46 7.3 Wartime output and controls: 1940–1945 02:34:01 7.4 Household gas, water, electricity, sanitation, heating, refrigeration 02:34:59 8 Postwar prosperity: 1945–1973 02:37:10 8.1 Agriculture 02:37:39 8.1.1 Farm machinery, fertilizer and high yield seed varieties 02:39:53 8.1.2 Government policies 02:40:02 8.2 Aircraft and air transportation industries 02:41:01 8.3 Housing 02:42:09 8.4 Interstate highway system 02:44:00 8.5 Computer Technology 02:46:04 8.6 Fiscal Policy 02:46:19 8.7 Military and space spending 02:47:04 9 Late 20th century 02:47:40 9.1 Post industrial (service) economy 02:49:18 9.2 Service sector expansion 02:49:27 9.3 Productivity slowdown 02:50:06 9.4 Inflation woes: 1970s 02:50:22 9.5 Deregulation and Reaganomics: 1976–1992 02:50:52 9.6 The rise of globalization: 1990s – late 2000 02:53:34 10 The 21st century 02:59:59 10.1 Great Recession 03:00:47 11 Historical statistics 03:01:26 11.1 GDP 03:04:51 11.1.1 1790–2006 GDP 03:05:01 11.2 Employment 03:05:10 11.3 Manufacturing 03:05:20 11.4 Wealth and Income 03:05:29 11.5 Productivity 03:05:37 11.6 Inequality 03:05:46 11.7 Health spending 03:06:10 11.8 Tariff Rates 03:06:18 11.9 Trade Balance 03:06:27 11.10 Inflation 03:06:35 11.11 US Federal Tax 03:06:44 11.12 Government spending 03:06:52 11.13 Debt 03:07:01 11.14 Deficit 03:07:10 12 See also 03:07:18 13 Footnotes 03:07:26 14 Bibliography 03:07:57 14.1 References 03:08:06 14.2 Special studies Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC ...
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