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We Don't Know: Magnetoreception
 
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This episode explores animals' ability to perceive magnetism or “magnetoreception." We know from behavioral evidence that many organisms, from bacteria, to lobsters, to pigeons sense and respond to magnetic fields but we are just starting to learn how this works. Learn more about magnetoreception: http://scim.ag/2gMOFS3
Views: 32259 Science Magazine
ROOT NODULE FORMATION AND BIOCHEMISTRY OF NOD GENES ||CSIR NET||PLANT BIOLOGY
 
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WELCOME TO TEACHING PATHSHALA!!!! TOPIC-ROOT NODULE FORMATION AND BIOCHEMISTRY OF NOD GENES ||CSIR NET||PLANT BIOLOGY Root nodules are organs induced on most species of legume plants by symbiotic, N2-fixing bacteria of the genera Azorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium, and Sinorhizobium collectively called rhizobia.  #CSIRNET #ROOTNODULES #NODGENES ******** ABOUT THIS CHANNEL ---This channel will have the syllabus wise lectures Video for CSIR-NET-Lifescience/GATE-Lifescience/BARC/ICMR-JRF/ICAR. ****** LIST OF IMPORTANT VIDEOS FOR CSIR NET EXAM- *****DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY-CSIR NET***** Vulva for mation in C.elegans (P-1)- https://youtu.be/ati-iJ9zWKM Vulva for mation in C.elegans (P-2)- https://youtu.be/el2SUaJhS4o Eye Lens Induction- https://youtu.be/FgyTxSejfaQ Axis(A-P) formation in Drosophila- https://youtu.be/-EjT2Xe2O1A Axis(D-V) formation in Drosophila- https://youtu.be/IMqgpbBw1qM ****PLANT BIOLOGY-CSIR NET**** Agrobacterium transformation-https://youtu.be/9pj_SRs2z58 shoot apical meristem-https://youtu.be/Q8KIQSoUufU Stress physiology (part-1)- https://youtu.be/YoNgSOIsk0A Stress physiology (part-2)- https://youtu.be/BTh8THX3Bgo Stress physiology (part-3)- https://youtu.be/66pQplA3bCQ Stress physiology (part-4)- https://youtu.be/Rztffk3ZjCQ Phytochrome- https://youtu.be/AkRxzA6AbJI Cryptochrome- https://youtu.be/cOOnt_hicFU Phototropin- https://youtu.be/GHyrQx04aCU ABC model of flower- https://youtu.be/Opkmx8xnQ94 ****ECOLOGY UNIT-CSIR NET**** Top Down control- https://youtu.be/k_tvKHkfw2M Island Theory- https://youtu.be/kK3kNOzHxMs Niche and character displacement- https://youtu.be/el9HXUelTEs COMPETITIVE EXCLUSION PRINCIPLE- https://youtu.be/zV3LxYDz-qE
Views: 7679 TEACHING PATHSHALA
Animals Seeing Spirits or Ghosts!
 
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We have all seen the videos of a dog or a cat interacting with what seems to be something we can not see. What is really happening? Is something there? Are these animals actually picking up on something that to us is invisible? It's common knowledge that dogs can smell things that humans can not. But a less discussed phenomenon is when dogs or cats are seeing things that we can not. Science has been probing at this for years and we still know very little. What we do know is that certain animal have a specific structure to their eyes that allows them to see Ultra Violet light. Animals can see magneticfields using what is called cryptochromes. Cryptochromes are a common group of light-sensitive molecules that exist in bacteria, plants, and animals. These specialized proteins enable certain animals, such as birds, insects, fish, and reptiles, to sense magnetic fields, allowing them to perceive direction, altitude, and location. It seems that many animals are able to see things humans can not. Many mammals can actually see they Ultra Violet light reflected from urine trails. With all of the evidence that animals are detecting things we can not we have to wonder what the animals are reacting to that remains unknown to us. In some cases the animals can even seem terrified. Let us know what you think these animals are seeing! https://twitter.com/TheInfoSquad https://www.facebook.com/TheInfoSquad http://cattime.com/cat-facts/lifestyle/2489-cats-can-see-things-that-are-invisible-to-humans http://www.petmd.com/news/health-science/what-cats-and-dogs-can-see-humans-cant-you-wont-believe-it-31380
Views: 1448 Info Squad
Joseph Takahashi (UT Southwestern/HHMI) Part 1A: Circadian Clocks: Clock Genes, Cells and Circuits
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/circadian-clocks/ Lecture Overview: Circadian rhythms are an adaptation to the 24 hr day that we experience. Takahashi begins his talk with an historic overview of how the genes controlling circadian clocks were first identified in Drosophila and the cloning tour de force that was required to identify clock genes in mice. He also describes the experiments that resulted in the realization that all cells in the body have a circadian clock, not just cells in the brain. In part 1B, Takahashi explains that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain generates a circadian rhythm of fluctuating body temperature that, in turn, signals to peripheral tissues. Heat shock factor 1 is one of the signaling molecules responsible for communicating the temperature information and resetting peripheral clocks. In Part 2, Takahashi describes how crossing many mice of different genetic backgrounds allowed his lab to identify several genes that impact the output of the clock gene system through different mechanisms. Takahashi begins the last part of his presentation with the crystal structures of BMAL and Clock, the two central activators of clock gene transcription. He goes on to describe how his lab showed that BMAL/Clock controls the DNA binding activity of transcriptional regulators of not only cycling genes, but also of basic cell functions such as RNA polymerase 2 occupancy and histone modification. Speaker Bio: Joseph Takahashi received his BA in biology from Swarthmore College, his PhD in neuroscience from the University of Oregon, and he was a post-doctoral fellow with Martin Zatz at the National Institutes of Mental Health. He then spent 26 years at Northwestern University where he was a faculty member in the Department of Neurobiology and Physiology and in 1997 he became an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 2008, Takahashi joined the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center as the Loyd B. Sands Distinguished Chair in Neuroscience. Using forward genetic screens in mice, Takahashi identified the first mammalian circadian gene "Clock" in 1997. Since then, his lab has gone on to identify and clone numerous circadian genes in both the brain and tissues throughout the body. Takahashi has received numerous awards and honors for his ground-breaking research including election to the National Academy of Sciences.
Views: 17732 iBiology
Exploring different optogenetic systems: Photocaging
 
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This video is part of our brand new e-learning course on optogenetics, https://www.embl.de/training/e-learning/optogenetics/index.html. Here we explain the principles behind photocaging – an optogenetics method that allows us to control a protein’s function by tagging it with a photoreceptor, such a LOV domain. Executive producer, stop motion animation & voice over: Richard Grandison Scientific concept & graphic design: Daniel Krueger Video producer & motion graphics: Claudiu Grozea Scientific advisor: Stefano de Renzis
CSIR-NET SOLVED QUESTIONS ON APOPTOSIS || IMPORTANT CONCEPTS |CELL BIOLOGY
 
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TOPIC OF DISCUSSION: CSIR-NET SOLVED QUESTIONS ON APOPTOSIS || IMPORTANT CONCEPTS |CELL BIOLOGY #APOPTOSIS #CSIRNETSOLVEDQUESTIONS Apoptosis is a programmed form of cell death involving the degradation of cellular constituents by a group of cysteine proteases called caspases. The caspases can be activated through either the intrinsic (mitochondrial mediated) or extrinsic (death receptor mediated) apoptotic pathways. **************************************************** ABOUT CHANNEL: This channel will have the syllabus wise lectures Video for CSIR-NET-Lifescience/GATE-Lifescience/BARC/ICMR-JRF/ICAR. ***************************************************** MORE VIDEOS ON CSIR NET What is CSIR NET?? Detail https://youtu.be/GVjtGwyGVoY APOPTOSIS (PART-1)- CSIR NET https://youtu.be/wTMcHPXUKJo APOPTOSIS (PART-2) | what are caspases??- CSIR NET https://youtu.be/w9tbW8IiGY8 APOPTOSIS (PART-3)| INTRINSIC PATHWAY-CSIR NET https://youtu.be/YWy11hXWv1k APOPTOSIS (PART-4)| EXTRINSIC PATHWAY-CSIR NET https://youtu.be/EfvZlbHTLFA APOPTOSIS IMPORTANT POINTS FOR CSIR NET https://youtu.be/FyFWkPDVjOc DIAUXIC GROWTH-CSIR NET https://youtu.be/UjJWNiB_pqc ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY SHIFT ASSAY || CSIR NET https://youtu.be/aVpCHdCY4rU Cre-loxP Recombination-For CSIR NET https://youtu.be/3NyuYxeKeVg PHOTOINHIBITION WITH CSIR QUESTIONS https://youtu.be/Rztffk3ZjCQ WATER STRESS-CSIR NET https://youtu.be/66pQplA3bCQ LOW TEMPERATURE STRESS/COLD STRESS-CSIR NET https://youtu.be/BTh8THX3Bgo HIGH TEMPERATURE STRESS IN PLANT-CSIR NET https://youtu.be/YoNgSOIsk0A AGROBACTERIUM MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER | CSIR NET | GATE | M.Sc. | B.Sc.| https://youtu.be/9pj_SRs2z58 Island Biogeography theory(Ecology)-for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/kK3kNOzHxMs Competitive Exclusion Principle (Ecology)-for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/zV3LxYDz-qE ABC model of flower-for CSIR NET/GATE/BARC https://youtu.be/Opkmx8xnQ94 Flower Development genes for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/fM8AIxZh7fM Island Biogeography theory-for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/kK3kNOzHxMs Phototropin- FOR CSIR-NET/GATE/BARC https://youtu.be/GHyrQx04aCU CSIR-previous year solved questions on sensory photobiology https://youtu.be/vSBZZ4djf88 Phytochrome-for CSIR-NET/GATE/BARC https://youtu.be/AkRxzA6AbJI CRYPTOCHROME- For CSIR-NET/GATE/BARC https://youtu.be/cOOnt_hicFU Introduction to Evolution- For CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/5Mo1uuICho0 For Knowing the Content of this channel https://youtu.be/SA_UVC4z-zQ Introduction of Evolution for CSIR-NET/GATE https://youtu.be/5Mo1uuICho0 thank you. LIKE SHARE and Subscribe for more such videos
Views: 5063 TEACHING PATHSHALA
Plant physiology
 
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Plant physiology is a subdiscipline of botany concerned with the functioning, or physiology, of plants. Closely related fields include plant morphology (structure of plants), plant ecology (interactions with the environment), phytochemistry (biochemistry of plants), cell biology, genetics, biophysics and molecular biology. Fundamental processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, plant nutrition, plant hormone functions, tropisms, nastic movements, photoperiodism, photomorphogenesis, circadian rhythms, environmental stress physiology, seed germination, dormancy and stomata function and transpiration, both parts of plant water relations, are studied by plant physiologists. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2354 Audiopedia
What the hell is Quantum Biology?
 
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What the hell is Quantum Biology? This topic was recommended by one of our patrons - Roman Rys! Thank you! Recommended to watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_RM77sWCUE&t=0s Support me at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/sciencephiletheai Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sciencephile/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Sciencephile_ Music: Piano Sonata No. 21 Great thanks to my Patreon supporters: Tovi Sonnenberg, Save the Dinosaurs, Joshua Titus, Harold Hardy and everyone else!
Views: 138233 Sciencephile the AI
How Quantum Biology Might Explain Life’s Biggest Questions | Jim Al-Khalili | TED Talks
 
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How does a robin know to fly south? The answer might be weirder than you think: Quantum physics may be involved. Jim Al-Khalili rounds up the extremely new, extremely strange world of quantum biology, where something Einstein once called “spooky action at a distance” helps birds navigate, and quantum effects might explain the origin of life itself. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 574381 TED
The Quantum Physics of Brain Science
 
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Brain science meets quantum physics in this first-ever Chicago Brain Buddies Live Show. Yeas it's quantum neurobiology, the quantum physics of brains! Astrophysicist Dr. Maria Weber joins Brain Buddies UChicago neuroscientist professor Peggy Mason and Chicago Council for Science and Technology Artist in Residence Aaron Freeman for a fun and funny talk about how what the earth's magnetic field is and how birds navigate it. Spoiler Alert - they use one of the most amazing quirks of quantum mechanics: entanglement. We have a lot of fun with and tell a bunch of jokes about electrons, retinas, planetary science, and the mysterious but ubiquitous cryptochrome.
Views: 96 Sciency Optimist
Dr. Satchin Panda on Time-Restricted Feeding and Its Effects on Obesity, Muscle Mass & Heart Health
 
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Dr. Rhonda Patrick speaks with Dr. Satchidananda Panda, a professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California. Satchin's work deals specifically with the timing of food and it's relationship with our biological clocks governed by circadian rhythm and also the circadian rhythm in general. ▶︎ Get the show notes! https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/satchin-panda In this video we discuss... •The fascinating history of experimentation that ultimately elucidated the location for the region of the brain necessary for a properly timed sleep-wake cycles. • The relationship between our body's "master clock" and it's many peripheral clocks. • Why infants sleep so intermittently, instead of resting for a longer, sustained duration like healthy young adults... and why this sustained rest also goes haywire in the elderly. • The fascinating work Dr. Panda took part in that lead to the discovery of a specialized light receptor in the eye that sets circadian rhythms and is known as melanopsin. • The important relationship between the relatively light insensitive melanopsin, which requires around 1,000 lux of light to be fully activated, and its control of the circadian clock by means of activation of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and suppression of melatonin. • The effects light exposure seems to have on next-day cortisol, a glucocorticoid hormone that regulates around 10-20% of the human protein-encoding genome. • The clever experimental design by which Dr. Panda and his colleagues discovered that certain circadian rhythms, especially of the liver, are entrained by when we eat, instead of how much light we get. This underlines the fact that, when managing are circadian rhythm, both elements are important! • One of the more surprising effects of time-restricted feeding in mice eating a so-called healthy diet: increases in muscle mass and even endurance in some cases. You can try out time-restricted feeding and contribute to human research! Commit to 14 weeks and download Dr. Panda's mobile app to get started. Learn more: http://mycircadianclock.org/participant ▶︎ Visit Satchin Panda's Website: http://www.mycircadianclock.org/ ▶︎ Satchin Panda on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SatchinPanda Links related to FoundMyFitness: ▶︎ Subscribe on YouTube: http://youtube.com/user/FoundMyFitness?sub_confirmation=1 ▶︎ Join my weekly email newsletter: http://www.foundmyfitness.com/?sendme=lifestyle-heuristic ▶︎ Crowdfund more videos: http://www.patreon.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Subscribe to the podcast: http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/foundmyfitness/id818198322 ▶︎ Twitter: http://twitter.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/foundmyfitness ▶︎ Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/foundmyfitness
Views: 548621 FoundMyFitness
Arabidopsis thaliana | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabidopsis_thaliana 00:01:04 1 Description 00:03:09 2 Taxonomy 00:04:38 3 Distribution and habitat 00:06:11 4 Use as a model organism 00:10:05 4.1 Genomics 00:10:14 4.1.1 Nuclear genome 00:11:59 4.1.2 Chloroplast genome 00:13:08 4.1.3 Mitochondrial genome 00:14:02 4.2 Genetics 00:18:04 4.2.1 Non-Mendelian inheritance controversy 00:18:52 4.3 Life cycle 00:19:54 5 Development 00:20:04 5.1 Flower development 00:22:07 5.2 Leaf development 00:24:29 5.3 Microscopy 00:25:42 6 Physiology 00:25:52 6.1 Light sensing, light emission, and circadian biology 00:28:42 6.2 On the Moon 00:29:36 7 Plant–pathogen interactions 00:38:32 7.1 Evolutionary aspect of plant-pathogen resistance 00:41:37 8 Other research 00:42:30 8.1 Self-pollination 00:43:56 9 Databases and other resources 00:44:35 10 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.70679576122458 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Arabidopsis thaliana, the thale cress, mouse-ear cress or arabidopsis, is a small flowering plant native to Eurasia and Africa. A. thaliana is considered a weed; it is found by roadsides and in disturbed land. A winter annual with a relatively short life cycle, A. thaliana is a popular model organism in plant biology and genetics. For a complex multicellular eukaryote, A. thaliana has a relatively small genome of approximately 135 megabase pairs (Mbp). It was the first plant to have its genome sequenced, and is a popular tool for understanding the molecular biology of many plant traits, including flower development and light sensing.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Plant perception (physiology) | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_perception_(physiology) 00:00:33 1 Processes 00:00:42 1.1 Detection 00:00:59 1.2 Pathway signals 00:01:31 1.2.1 Neurochemicals 00:01:57 1.2.2 Electrophysiology 00:02:44 1.3 Signal response 00:04:34 2 Aspects of perception 00:04:43 2.1 Light 00:06:30 2.2 Gravity 00:07:59 3 Plant intelligence 00:12:44 3.1 Comparison to neurobiology 00:14:56 3.2 Parallels in other taxa Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9333963520083455 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Plant perception or Plant Gnosophysiology is the ability of plants to sense and respond to the environment to adjust their morphology, physiology, and phenotype accordingly. Other disciplines such as plant physiology, ecology and molecular biology are used to assess this ability. Plants react to chemicals, gravity, light, moisture, infections, temperature, oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations, parasite infestation, disease, physical disruption, sound, and touch.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
Quantum Biology: The Hidden Nature of Nature
 
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Can the spooky world of quantum physics explain bird navigation, photosynthesis and even our delicate sense of smell? Clues are mounting that the rules governing the subatomic realm may play an unexpectedly pivotal role in the visible world. Join leading thinkers in the emerging field of quantum biology as they explore the hidden hand of quantum physics in everyday life and discuss how these insights may one day revolutionize thinking on everything from the energy crisis to quantum computers. The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows a broad general audience to engage with scientific discoveries. Our mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for all the latest from WSF. Visit our Website: http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/worldsciencefestival Follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/WorldSciFest Original Program Date: June 1, 2012 MODERATOR: John Hockenberry PARTICIPANTS: Paul Davies, Seth Lloyd, Thorsten Ritz John Hockenberry's introduction 00:13 Participant Introductions 06:28 How is there a convergence between biology and the quantum? 7:45 Are particles in two places at once or is this based just on observations? 12:43 Are biological states creating a unique quantum rules? 17:32 Quantum mechanics is so counterintuitive. 23:00 Can nature have a quantum sense? 27:29 The quantum migration of birds... With bird brains? 31:50 Electron spin and magnetic fields. 37:00 Cryptochrome releases particles with spin and the bird knows where to go. 40:28 How is bird migration an example for evolution? 49:13 photosynthesis and quantum phenomena. 55:00 Bacteria doing quantum search. 1:00:21 Is quantum tunneling the key to quantum biology? 1:06:56 What are the experiments that prove this? 1:12:28 When fields converge how do you determine causality? 1:19:49 We have no idea how life began. 1:24:59 Replication leads to variation which is the beginning of life? 1:31:05
Views: 615687 World Science Festival
Joseph Takahashi (UT Southwestern/HHMI) Part 3: Circadian Clocks: Molecular Basis of a Clock
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/genetics-and-gene-regulation/circadian-clocks/#part-4 Lecture Overview: Circadian rhythms are an adaptation to the 24 hr day that we experience. Takahashi begins his talk with an historic overview of how the genes controlling circadian clocks were first identified in Drosophila and the cloning tour de force that was required to identify clock genes in mice. He also describes the experiments that resulted in the realization that all cells in the body have a circadian clock, not just cells in the brain. In part 1B, Takahashi explains that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain generates a circadian rhythm of fluctuating body temperature that, in turn, signals to peripheral tissues. Heat shock factor 1 is one of the signaling molecules responsible for communicating the temperature information and resetting peripheral clocks. In Part 2, Takahashi describes how crossing many mice of different genetic backgrounds allowed his lab to identify several genes that impact the output of the clock gene system through different mechanisms. Takahashi begins the last part of his presentation with the crystal structures of BMAL and Clock, the two central activators of clock gene transcription. He goes on to describe how his lab showed that BMAL/Clock controls the DNA binding activity of transcriptional regulators of not only cycling genes, but also of basic cell functions such as RNA polymerase 2 occupancy and histone modification. Speaker Bio: Joseph Takahashi received his BA in biology from Swarthmore College, his PhD in neuroscience from the University of Oregon, and he was a post-doctoral fellow with Martin Zatz at the National Institutes of Mental Health. He then spent 26 years at Northwestern University where he was a faculty member in the Department of Neurobiology and Physiology and in 1997 he became an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. In 2008, Takahashi joined the University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center as the Loyd B. Sands Distinguished Chair in Neuroscience. Using forward genetic screens in mice, Takahashi identified the first mammalian circadian gene "Clock" in 1997. Since then, his lab has gone on to identify and clone numerous circadian genes in both the brain and tissues throughout the body. Takahashi has received numerous awards and honors for his ground-breaking research including election to the National Academy of Sciences.
Views: 3562 iBiology
Circadian rhythm | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Circadian rhythm 00:01:19 1 History 00:05:52 2 Criteria 00:08:00 3 Origin 00:11:50 4 Importance in animals 00:12:51 4.1 Effect of circadian disruption 00:13:35 4.2 Effect of light–dark cycle 00:15:02 4.3 Arctic animals 00:16:06 4.4 Butterfly and moth 00:16:43 5 In plants 00:20:58 6 In iDrosophila/i 00:23:05 7 In mammals 00:25:04 7.1 Humans 00:25:57 7.2 Biological markers and effects 00:28:40 7.3 Outside the "master clock" 00:29:42 8 Light and the biological clock 00:30:13 9 Enforced longer cycles 00:31:03 10 Human health 00:31:59 10.1 Indoor lighting 00:32:33 10.2 Obesity and diabetes 00:33:31 10.3 Airline pilots and cabin crew 00:34:08 10.4 Disruption 00:35:15 10.5 Effect of drugs 00:36:40 11 Society and culture Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= A circadian rhythm () is any biological process that displays an endogenous, entrainable oscillation of about 24 hours. These 24-hour rhythms are driven by a circadian clock, and they have been widely observed in plants, animals, fungi, and cyanobacteria.The term circadian comes from the Latin circa, meaning "around" (or "approximately"), and diēm, meaning "day". The formal study of biological temporal rhythms, such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology. Processes with 24-hour oscillations are more generally called diurnal rhythms; strictly speaking, they should not be called circadian rhythms unless their endogenous nature is confirmed.Although circadian rhythms are endogenous ("built-in", self-sustained), they are adjusted (entrained) to the local environment by external cues called zeitgebers (from German, "time giver"), which include light, temperature and redox cycles. In medical science, an abnormal circadian rhythm in humans is known as circadian rhythm disorder.In 2017, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young "for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm" in fruit flies.
Views: 20 wikipedia tts
Plant biochemistry | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_physiology 00:00:46 1 Aims 00:04:46 2 Biochemistry of plants 00:05:56 2.1 Constituent elements 00:06:45 2.2 Pigments 00:09:52 3 Signals and regulators 00:10:19 3.1 Plant hormones 00:11:41 3.2 Photomorphogenesis 00:13:29 3.3 Photoperiodism 00:15:07 4 Environmental physiology 00:16:38 4.1 Tropisms and nastic movements 00:18:32 4.2 Plant disease 00:20:01 5 History 00:20:10 5.1 Early history 00:22:07 5.2 Current research 00:22:42 6 Economic applications 00:22:51 6.1 Food production 00:23:34 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9684034115290305 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-E "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Plant physiology is a subdiscipline of botany concerned with the functioning, or physiology, of plants. Closely related fields include plant morphology (structure of plants), plant ecology (interactions with the environment), phytochemistry (biochemistry of plants), cell biology, genetics, biophysics and molecular biology. Fundamental processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, plant nutrition, plant hormone functions, tropisms, nastic movements, photoperiodism, photomorphogenesis, circadian rhythms, environmental stress physiology, seed germination, dormancy and stomata function and transpiration, both parts of plant water relations, are studied by plant physiologists.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Spotlight Interview with Dr Katja A Lamia
 
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Watch an interview with Dr Lamia about her research, produced by BioClock Studio Winter 2017.
Views: 241 The BioClock Studio
Plant physiologist | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_physiology 00:00:49 1 Aims 00:05:11 2 Biochemistry of plants 00:06:26 2.1 Constituent elements 00:07:20 2.2 Pigments 00:10:42 3 Signals and regulators 00:11:12 3.1 Plant hormones 00:12:40 3.2 Photomorphogenesis 00:14:39 3.3 Photoperiodism 00:16:25 4 Environmental physiology 00:18:03 4.1 Tropisms and nastic movements 00:20:08 4.2 Plant disease 00:21:45 5 History 00:21:54 5.1 Early history 00:24:01 5.2 Current research 00:24:38 6 Economic applications 00:24:49 6.1 Food production 00:25:34 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9303643444486306 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Plant physiology is a subdiscipline of botany concerned with the functioning, or physiology, of plants. Closely related fields include plant morphology (structure of plants), plant ecology (interactions with the environment), phytochemistry (biochemistry of plants), cell biology, genetics, biophysics and molecular biology. Fundamental processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, plant nutrition, plant hormone functions, tropisms, nastic movements, photoperiodism, photomorphogenesis, circadian rhythms, environmental stress physiology, seed germination, dormancy and stomata function and transpiration, both parts of plant water relations, are studied by plant physiologists.
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Plant physiology | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_physiology 00:00:49 1 Aims 00:05:03 2 Biochemistry of plants 00:06:17 2.1 Constituent elements 00:07:09 2.2 Pigments 00:10:24 3 Signals and regulators 00:10:53 3.1 Plant hormones 00:12:19 3.2 Photomorphogenesis 00:14:15 3.3 Photoperiodism 00:15:58 4 Environmental physiology 00:17:34 4.1 Tropisms and nastic movements 00:19:36 4.2 Plant disease 00:21:10 5 History 00:21:19 5.1 Early history 00:23:20 5.2 Current research 00:23:56 6 Economic applications 00:24:07 6.1 Food production 00:24:51 7 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9575329818365272 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Plant physiology is a subdiscipline of botany concerned with the functioning, or physiology, of plants. Closely related fields include plant morphology (structure of plants), plant ecology (interactions with the environment), phytochemistry (biochemistry of plants), cell biology, genetics, biophysics and molecular biology. Fundamental processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, plant nutrition, plant hormone functions, tropisms, nastic movements, photoperiodism, photomorphogenesis, circadian rhythms, environmental stress physiology, seed germination, dormancy and stomata function and transpiration, both parts of plant water relations, are studied by plant physiologists.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Quantum biology | Wikipedia audio article
 
16:01
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_biology 00:01:00 1 History 00:02:15 2 Applications 00:02:24 2.1 Photosynthesis 00:05:14 2.2 DNA 00:05:23 2.2.1 Mutation 00:06:25 2.2.2 Repair 00:07:45 2.3 Vibration Theory of Olfaction 00:09:48 2.4 Vision 00:10:38 2.4.1 Quantum Vision Implications 00:11:27 2.5 Enzymatic activity (quantum biochemistry) 00:13:01 2.6 Magnetoreception 00:15:39 2.7 Other biological applications Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Quantum biology refers to applications of quantum mechanics and theoretical chemistry to biological objects and problems. Many biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve chemical reactions, light absorption, formation of excited electronic states, transfer of excitation energy, and the transfer of electrons and protons (hydrogen ions) in chemical processes such as photosynthesis, olfaction and cellular respiration. Quantum biology may use computations to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects. Quantum biology is concerned with the influence of non-trivial quantum phenomena, as opposed to trivial phenomena, which can be explained by reducing the biological process to fundamental physics. This article provides an overview of biological processes that cannot be explained without quantum mechanisms.
Views: 7 wikipedia tts