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Search results “Determining basicity of anions charge”
How to decide the Relative Strength of Acids and Bases ? - Part 1
 
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The ability to decide the relative strength of acids and bases is very important in Organic Chemistry. It helps us to understand what groups will get attacked by what other groups and whether the reaction is moving in the right direction. 'Strong and reactive tends to become Stable and Weak'. In this series of videos, we look at all the factors that we can use to judge the order of acid or base strengths of a given set of compounds. We can then arrange them in either increasing or decreasing order of acidity / basicity. The first important factor that helps us decide the relative strength of bases is the atom carrying the negative charge. When you move from left to right in a period, the negative charge becomes more stable and hence less reactive. Thus, basicity decreases. Similarly, down the group, negative charge is stabilized. So, when you move from top to bottom in a group, again basic strength decreases.
Views: 41514 Busting JEE Main
Aromatic, Antiaromatic, or Nonaromatic, Huckel's Rule, 4n+2, Heterocycles, Aromaticity
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial shows you how to tell if a compound is aromatic, antiaromatic or nonaromatic by using huckel's rule / number of 4n+2 pi electrons, and features of the compound such as whether or not if it's cyclic, conjugated, sp2 hybridized and planar. Organic Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5vjCqnVb6s&index=1&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BU3gxU8RwqkEET2ilZ80Znj Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Examples and practice problems in this video include cyclobutadiene, benzene, cyclooctatetraene, pentalene, 1,3,5-hexatriene, naphthalene, anthracene, tropylium ion, cyclopropenyl cation radical & anion, cyclopentadienyl radical cation & anion, cyclooctarienyl dianion, cyclohexatrienyl cation, radical, & anion, pyrrole, furan, pyran, isoxazole, tub conformation of cyclooctatetraene, heterocycles such as thiophene, 1,3-thiazole, pyrimidine, purine, pyrylium ion, & imidazole. This video also helps you to see which nitrogen atom is basic and which is not. It clearly helps you to see the difference in aromaticity vs antiaromaticity.
Using Charge to Rank Acid Base Strength in Organic Chemistry
 
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http://leah4sci.com/acidbase presents: CARIO C = Charge to Rank Acidity and Basicity in Organic Chemistry Need help with orgo? Download my free guide '10 Secrets to Acing Organic Chemistry' HERE: http://leah4sci.com/orgo-ebook/ Video 3 in my Orgo acid base series shows you how to rank acids and bases by comparing the charges of acids, or charges of conjugate base. Catch the entire series, along with my acid/base cheat sheet and practice prolem set on my website: http://leah4sci.com/acidbase For more in-depth review including practice problems and explanations, check out my online membership site: http://studyhall.leah4sci.com/join For private online tutoring visit my website: http://leah4sci.com/organic-chemistry-tutor/
Views: 45521 Leah4sci
nucleophilicity and basicity
 
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Correction: I forgot to draw a negative charge next to the first iodide anion. More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=Iit8p6xzfr8
How to Memorize The Polyatomic Ions, Formulas, Charges, Naming, Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains how to memorize the polyatomic ions. It provides the name of the common polyatomic ions, the charges and their respective formulas as well. Common polyatomic ions include sulfate, nitrate, acetate, ammonium, hydroxide, sulfite, cyanide, phosphate, disulfide, bicarbonate, hydrogen sulfate, bisulfite, chromate, dichromate, pyrophosphate, permanganate, thiosulfate, peroxide, superoxide, oxalate, borate, iodate, perchlorate, hypochlorite, bromite, and nitrite just to name a few. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems including a quiz that tests you to see if you remember the common polyatomic ions.
Huge Misconception: Protons, Electrons, Atoms, and Ions
 
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Here's one of the most common misconceptions in Chemistry. Many people think that it an atom or group of atoms, the number of protons and the number of electrons always has to be the same. This isn't true! There are many cases where the number of protons and electrons are different. This is what causes electrical charge, and it creates ions, like anions and cations. Where does this misconception come from? It may come from the fact that in electrically neutral atoms, the number of protons and neutrons has to be the same. And often, we assume that atoms are neutral, even when they're not.
Views: 43305 Tyler DeWitt
Ionization Energy - Basic Introduction
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into Ionization Energy. It discusses the periodic trends and exceptions as well as providing plenty of examples and practice problems. The first ionization energy is the energy required to remove an electron from a gaseous atom or ion. The second ionization energy is associated with the removal of the second electron. Ionization energy increases with effective nuclear charge but decreases with distance, shielding and electron repulsions. Paired electrons typically have lower ionization energies that unpaired electrons. This explains how to determine which element and ion has the greater first ionization energy. It covers cations and anions and how to rank elements in order of increasing ionization energy. In addition, it discusses how to identify the element given the ionization energies of that element using valence electrons and core electrons. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Acid strength, anion size, and bond energy | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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How anion size and bond dissociation energies affect acid strength. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/acids-and-bases-topic/copy-of-acid-base-equilibria/v/conjugate-acids-and-bases?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/acids-and-bases-topic/acids-and-bases/v/strong-acids-and-strong-bases?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Factors that affect acidity (1) - Charge
 
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For more, go to http://masterorganicchemistry.com
Ionic Radius vs Atomic Radius Periodic Trend
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on periodic trends such as ionic radius and atomic radius. It provides plenty of examples and explains the fundamental concepts of why some ions are smaller than atoms while others are larger. Here is a list of topics 1. Atomic Radii decreases left to right 2. Effective Nuclear Charge, Atomic Number, and Number of Protons 3. Atomic Radius Increases from top to bottom in the periodic table due to additional energy levels 4. Neutral vs Positively Charged Ion / Cation – Number of Shells or Energy Levels 5. Neutral Parent Atom vs Negatively Charged Ion / Anion – Electron Repulsion & Electron Cloud Expansion 6. General Ionic Radii Trend – Cations are smaller than Anions
Soluble and Insoluble Compounds Chart - Solubility Rules Table - List of Salts & Substances
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses the difference between soluble and insoluble compounds. It contains a table or chart of the solubility rules and it provides a list of salts and substances - some of which are soluble while others are insoluble. This video contains a worksheet of examples and problems toward the end of the video including answers and solutions. Here is a list of topics: 1. Understanding The Solubility Rules Table 2. Ions that are always soluble - Na+, K+, Li+, NH4+, C2H3O2-, Cs+, Rb+, ClO4-, ClO3-, and HCO3- 3. Ions that are generally soluble - Cl-, Br-, I- (halides) - Exceptions - Pb2+, Ag+, Hg2 2+ 4. Sulfates are generally soluble except with Ba2+, Ca+2, and Sr2+ 5. The difference between soluble and insoluble compounds - aqueous vs solid phases 6. Substances that are generally insoluble - Hydroxides, carbonates, sulfides, and phosphates
Ionization Energy Electron Affinity Atomic Radius Ionic Radii Electronegativity Metallic Character
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains the concepts of periodic trends such as first ionization energy, electron affinity, atomic radius, and ionic radii, electronegativity and metallic character. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. Periodic Trends - Atomic Size 2. Atomic Radii - Effective Nuclear Charging - Adding Protons to Increase The Charge of the Nucleus 3. Inner Core Electrons vs Outer Valence Electrons 4. Atomic Radius Increases from left to right 5. Atomic Radii Increases from top to bottom on the periodic table 6. Shielding Effect and Electron Repulsion 7. Coulomb's Law Equation / Formula - Relationship Between Electrostatic Force, Distance, and Charge - like charges repel and opposite charges attract. 8. Ionic Radii Trend - Cations vs Anions 9. Positively Charged Ions are Smaller Than Parent Neutral Atom 10. Negatively Charged Ions are Larger Than Parent Atom 11. How to calculate the number of electrons in an atom or ion 12. Principal quantum number and number of shells - atomic size 13. How to rank the elements in order of increasing atomic radii 14. how to rank isoelectronic ions in decreasing order of atomic / ionic size 15. isoelectronic species - same electron configuration 16. Metallic Character Trend - Metals vs Nonmetals 17. Electronegativity Trend - The ability of an atom to attract an electron to itself - increases toward fluorine 18. Electronegative Nonmetals vs Electropositive Metals 19. First Ionization Energy Trend - Increases left to right and bottom to top across a group 20. Ionization Energy - Energy required to remove an electron from a gaseous atom 21. First Ionization Energy vs Second Ionization Energy 22. Jump in Ionization Energy - Number of Valence Electrons 23. Ionization Energy Exceptions - Paired vs Unpaired Electrons in 2s and 2p orbitals 24. Electron Affinity Trend - The Energy change associated with the addition of an electron to a gaseous atom 25. Exothermic vs Endothermic Electron Affinity Processes 26. Half Filled vs Empty S and p orbitals 27.
Introduction to ions
 
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Difference between ions and atoms. Calculating charge on an ion.
Views: 199858 Khan Academy
Formulas and Charge of Polyatomic Ions
 
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A cool system for finding the formula and charge for the basic polyatomic ions.
Views: 2478 Elroi Academy
Atom Size and Electronegativity to Rank Acid Strength in Organic Chemistry
 
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http://leah4sci.com/acidbase presents: CARIO A = Atom (size and electronegativity) to Rank Acidity and Basicity in Organic Chemistry Need help with orgo? Download my free guide '10 Secrets to Acing Organic Chemistry' HERE: http://leah4sci.com/orgo-ebook/ Video 4 in my Orgo acid base series shows you how to rank acids and bases by comparing the electronegativity of atoms in the same period, or by comparing size of atoms in the same group on the periodic table. Catch the entire series, along with my acid/base cheat sheet and practice prolem set on my website: http://leah4sci.com/acidbase For more in-depth review including practice problems and explanations, check out my online membership site: http://studyhall.leah4sci.com/join For private online tutoring visit my website: http://leah4sci.com/organic-chemistry-tutor/
Views: 54762 Leah4sci
How to Identify the Charge of an Ion : Chemistry Lessons
 
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehoweducation Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehoweducation You can identify the charge of an ion by carefully paying attention to a few key traits. Find out how to identify the charge of an ion with help from an experienced chemistry professional in this free video clip. Expert: Robin Higgins Filmmaker: bjorn wilde Series Description: Chemistry plays a very important role in all of our lives each and every day. Get tips on chemistry with help from an experienced chemistry professional in this free video series.
Views: 189132 eHowEducation
Cations and Anions Explained
 
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This video explains the difference between cations and anions.
Writing Ionic Formulas: Introduction
 
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Here's how to write formulas for binary ionic compounds. We'll see how you have to balance the charges of the two ions so they cancel each other out.
Views: 1730697 Tyler DeWitt
Writing Ionic Formulas - Basic Introduction
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides an introduction to writing the formula of an ionic compound that contains transition metals with roman numerals and polyatomic ions. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems that you can help you with your next worksheet assignment. Here is a list of topics: 1. Writing Formulas For Ionic Compounds - Same Charged Ions 2. Monoatomic vs Polyatomic Ions List 3. Charges of Common Monoatomic Ions Based On Group Number In the Periodic Table of Elements 4. Transition Metals and Roman Numeral System List of Examples and Chemical Formulas: Sodium Chloride, Calcium Sulfide, Aluminum Nitride, Lithium Oxide, Gallium Bromide, Magnesium Phosphite, Potassium Sulfate, Strontium Phosphate, Barium Nitrate, Iron (II) Sulfide, Copper (II) Nitrite, Copper (I) Phosphite, Vanadium (V) Dichromate, and Leav (IV) Oxide.
Acids, Bases, and pH
 
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Paul Andersen explains pH as the power of hydrogen. He explains how increases in the hydronium ion (or hydrogen ion) concentration can lower the pH and create acids. He also explains how the reverse is true. An analysis of a strong acid and strong base is also included. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License All images are either Public Domain or Creative Commons Attribution Licenses: Bordercolliez. English: A Roll of Universal Indicator Paper., June 23, 2011. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Universal_indicator_paper.jpg. "File:Myoglobin.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 30, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Myoglobin.png. "File:WOA05 GLODAP Del pH AYool.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed April 30, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:WOA05_GLODAP_del_pH_AYool.png. Slower. pH Scale Showing Common Substances, 2006. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:PH_scale.png.
Views: 989634 Bozeman Science
Isoelectric point and zwitterions | Chemical processes | MCAT | Khan Academy
 
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The isoelectric point of an amino acid is the pH at which the amino acid has a neutral charge. You will learn how to calculate the isoelectric point, and the effects of pH on the amino acid's overall charge. We will also discuss zwitterions, or the forms of amino acids that dominate at the isoelectric point. By Tracy Kovach. Created by Tracy Kim Kovach. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/chemical-processes/amino-acids-peptides-proteins-5d/v/classification-amino-acids?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/chemical-processes/amino-acids-peptides-proteins-5d/v/amino-acid-structure?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s MCAT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDkK5wqSuwDlJ3_nl3rgdiQ?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 373810 khanacademymedicine
Determining The Charge On A Metal Ion
 
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This video explains how to find the charge of a transition metal ion that is part of a compound.
Views: 47056 Brad Calvin
Writing Formulas with Polyatomic Ions
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry Here's how to write formulas for ionic compounds that contain polyatomic ions. In order to write formulas for polyatomic ions, you have to look at a chart or table of polyatomic ions to find out what the charge of each one is. Then, you figure out how many other ions will be necessary to balance out the charges and make it neutral.
Views: 1059291 Tyler DeWitt
What's an Ion?
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry Confused about ions? We'll learn the difference between an atom and an ion. Ions are formed because of a net charge on an atom, because the number of protons and electrons do not balance. This means that the atom is no longer electrically neutral, but is a cation or an anion. We also talk about polyatomic ions.
Views: 628155 Tyler DeWitt
Electron Configuration of Ions - Sodium (Na), Bromine (Br), and Cobalt (Co)
 
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This video shows you how to write the electron configuration of elements such as Sodium (Na), Bromine (Br) and Cobalt (Co). It also shows you how to write the electron configuration of anions and cations that have charges such as sodium (Na+), bromide (Br-), and transition metal ion cobalt (Co+3).
How To Speak Chemistrian: Crash Course Chemistry #11
 
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Learning to talk about chemistry can be like learning a foreign language, but Hank is here to help with some straightforward and simple rules to help you learn to speak Chemistrian like a native. Table of Contents Determining Formulas and Names of Monatomic Ions 2:06 Finding Cation-and Anion Forming Elements on the Periodic Table 3:29 Writing Formulas and Naming Transition Metals 4:02 Naming Acids and their Anions 5:35 Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 980403 CrashCourse
Quantum Numbers - The Easy Way!
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains the 4 quantum numbers n l ml and ms and how it relates to the electron configuration of an element. It also shows you how to draw the atomic orbital diagrams and the orbital energy levels of an atom. It explains the sublevels s p d and f. This video contains plenty of notes, examples, and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. How to write the ground state electron configuration of an element 2. Electron Configuration Using Noble Gas Notation 3. Electron Configuration of Atoms and Ions - Fluorine (F), Phosphorus (P), Phosphide (P-3), Iron (Fe), Fe+2, Fe+3, 4. Mass Number vs Atomic Number 5. How to determine the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons inside an atom or ion 6. Electron Configuration Exceptions - Cr 7. Cations vs Anions - Positively Charged vs Negatively Charged Ions 8. How to draw the orbital diagram of an atom 9. How to Draw The Orbital Energy Level Diagram of an Atom 10. How to tell if an element is paramagnetic or diamagnetic 11. Paramagnetic - Unpaired Electrons vs Diamagnetic - Paired Electrons 12. Electron Spin around Nucleus - Moving Charge Creates Magnetic Field - Tiny Bar Magnets - North & South Pole 13. How to determine the number of unpaired electrons in an element / atom 14. Aufbau Principle - Filling Electrons In Lower Energy Levels First in order of increasing energy 15. Hund's Rule - Adding Electrons to degenerate orbitals (same energy) one at a time with parallel spins 16. How to determine the number of valence electrons and core electrons in an atom using electron configuration 17. How to identify the element given electron configuration 18. How to identify which element is in the excited state vs ground state given electron configuration 19. n - principal quantum number - main energy level - boh's model of atoms 20. l - azimuthal angular momentum quantum number - sublevel or shape of atomic orbital - s p d f g h 21. ml - magnetic quantum number - describes specific orbital within sublevel 22. ms - electron spin +1/2 or -1/2 up arrow or down arrow 23. l, n-1 equation / formula 24. ml is between -l and l 25. How to identify the 4 quantum numbers n l ml and ms using electron configuration 26. Pauli Exclusion Principle - No two electrons can have the same four set of quantum numbers 27. How to determine the maximum number of electrons given quantum numbers n l ml ms 28. Max number of electrons in an energy level is 2n^2 29. Maximum number of orbitals in an energy level is n^2 30. l=0 for s, l=1 for p, l=2 for d, l=3 for f, l=4 for g, l=5 for h 31. Multiple Choice Practice Problems 32. How to determine the number of s electrons, p electrons and d electrons inside an atom using electron configuration and using the periodic table 33. How to determine which 4 set of quantum numbers are allowed and which are incorrect 34. How to identify the orbital / sublevel given n and l 35. Orbital filling diagram
Solubility of Ionic Compounds: Basics and Rules
 
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Basic discussion on the solubility of ionic compounds and the rules for determining whether an ionic compound is soluble or insoluble.
Views: 130052 Ben's Chem Videos
Naming Acids Introduction
 
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How do you name acids? We'll learn how to look at the chemical formula for an acid and then write its name. We will focus on both acids without oxygen and also acids that contain oxygen, which are sometimes called oxoacids. In order to name an acid, you need separate the H+ from the negative ion. Then you figure out the name of the negative ion, and use rules for acid compound naming. If the negative ion ends in -ide, the acid is hydro- -ic acid. If the negative ion ends in -ate, the acid is -ic acid. If the negative ion ends in -ite, the acid is -ous acid. It's also important to note that there are some exceptions: phosphoric acid, phosphorous acid, sulfuric acid and sulfurous acid.
Views: 607781 Tyler DeWitt
Carbocation Stability - Resonance & Rearrangement - Allylic & Vinylic Examples - Organic Chemistry
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial explains how to determine which carbocation is most stable. It provides plenty of examples including allylic and vinylic carbocations using resonance structures to explain why allylic carbocations are most stable. It also provide examples of carbocations containing electron donating groups and electron withdrawing groups. It also discusses why tertiary carbocations are more stable than primary and secondary carbocations using terms such as hyperconjugation and the inductive effect.
Charge of an amino acid
 
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How do we calculate the charge of an amino acid at a given pH? What happens when pH = pKa?
Views: 26558 Dr. Chubits
Intermolecular Forces - Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole, Ion-Dipole, London Dispersion Interactions
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on intermolecular forces such hydrogen bonding, ion-ion interactions, dipole dipole, ion dipole, london dispersion forces and van deer waal forces. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems to help you understand the most important concepts related to this material. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics: 1. Ion - Ion dipole interactions of KF and CaO 2. Electrostatic Force and Lattice Energy- The effect of charge and ionic radii or size 3. How To Determine Which Ionic Compound has a Higher Melting Point - NaF vs KCl 4. Ion-Dipole Interactions - NaCl and H2O 5. Definition of a Dipole - Polar Molecules & Charge Separation 6. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Polar Molecules - Partial Charge Electrostatic Attractions of CO 7. Hydrogen Bonding between Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine 8. Intermolecular Forces vs Intramolecular Forces 9. Hydrogen Bonding vs Polar & Nonpolar Covalent Bonds 10. London Dispersion Forces & Van Der Waals Forces 11. Permanent Dipoles and Temporary Induced Dipoles - Distribution of electrons in electron cloud 12. Difference Between Atoms and Ions - Cations vs Anions - Number of Electrons and Protons 13. The relationship between Polarizability and Dispersion Forces 14. How To Determine the Strongest Intermolecular Forces In Compounds Such as MgO, KCl, H2O, CH4, CO2, SO2, HF, CH3OH, LiCl, CH2O, CO, and I2 15. The relationship between Boiling Point and Vapor Pressure 16. Straight Chained vs Branched Alkanes - Boiling Point and Intermolecular Forces - Surface Area 17. Ranking Boiling Point In Order of Increasing Strength for I2, Br2, F2, and Cl2 18. Polar and Nonpolar Organic Compounds - Polarity and Water Solubility 19. Ranking Boiling In Decreasing Order For HF, HCl, HBr, and HI 20. The effect of Molar Mass and Number of electrons on the Overall Intermolecular Force / LDF
Which molecule is more basic?  Organic Chemistry Part 1
 
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Which molecule is more basic?
Views: 3282 Anything Science
Organic Chemistry Resonance Structures - Rules, Practice Examples, Formal Charge, Drawing Compounds
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial shows you how to draw resonance structures. It provides the rules that you need to know along with plenty of examples and practice problems. It shows you how to calculate the formal charge of an element in a compound and it shows you how to determine the major resonance contributor and the minor resonance structure by identifying which resonance structure is more or less stable using principles such as electronegativity, atomic and ionic size, formal charge separation, aromaticity and octet sastifactory requirements. This video lecture explains why secondary carbocations are more stable than primary carbocations and why the reverse is true in the case of carbanions. It explains this concept using principles such as the inductive effect, hyperconjugation, and the presence of electron donating groups. This video lecture contains plenty of notes and examples for you to remember whenever your drawing resonance structures.
Complex Ions, Ligands, & Coordination Compounds, Basic Introduction   Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into complex ions, ligands, and coordination compounds. A complex ion typically consist of a transition metal cation bounded to ligands which can be neutral molecules or ions. The number of ligands attached to the transition metal ion is known as the coordination number. This video explains how to determine the oxidation state of the transition metal ion in a complex ion and within a coordination compound. A coordination compound consist of a complex ion and a counterion. The counterion may be a cation or an anion. This video briefly discusses werner's theory of coordination compounds and the concept of primary valence and secondary valence as it relates to the transition metal ions in complex ions. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Elements, Atoms, Molecules, Ions, Ionic and Molecular Compounds, Cations vs Anions, Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains the difference between elements, atoms, molecules, and ions. It also explains how to distinguish ionic and molecular compounds also known as covalent compounds. Atoms are electrically neutral and contain equal number of protons and electrons. Ions have a net charge and contain a different number of protons and electrons. Positively charged ions are known as cations and negatively charged ions are known as anions. Atoms and Ions have the same number of neutrons. A molecule is particle consisting of multiple atoms. Pure elements are substances composed of one type of atom where as a compound is made up of different types of atoms. Ionic compounds consist of metals and nonmetals and contain ions with charges. Covalent compounds or molecular compounds usually consist of nonmetals.
What's a polyatomic ion?
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry We'll learn what polyatomic ions are. Polyatomic ions are created when a number of atoms come to together to form a group, and then that group has either a positive or a negative charge, which means that it can be either a cation or an anion. We discuss how protons and electrons balance to give a net charge, and then discuss some common polyatomic ions.
Views: 412329 Tyler DeWitt
Nucleophilicity vs. Basicity
 
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Nucleophilicity vs. Basicity . The difference between what it means to be a nucleophile and a base More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=Mx7KM-k2MMo
Views: 312396 Khan Academy
Cation Exchange
 
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Not all soils are created equal. Chemistry helps agriculture succeed in a variety of environments. This video explains how soils (often negatively charged) interact with nutrients (often positively charged) through cation exchange. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of a soil determines how frequently and in what doses it should receive fertilizer. © 2016, NMSU Board of Regents. NMSU is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and educator. This material is based upon work supported by the Hispanic-Serving Institutions Education Grants Program, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, under agreement No. 2014-38422-22089. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Views: 61627 LearningGamesLab
Organic Chemistry Acids & bases P29 - How To Use pKa To Determine Which Acid is Stronger?
 
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This video shows you how to use pKa to determine which acid is stronger. It also tells you the difference between Ka and pKa.
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1468719 CrashCourse
Finding the Ionic Charge for Elements on the Periodic Table
 
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Finding ionic charges for elements on the Periodic Table is a fundamental skill in chemistry. There are two primary methods to help you remember the charges. The first method is to consider the ionic charges for elements in their groups. As you go down a group on the Periodic Table elements tend to have the same ionic charge. For example, elements in Groups One all have a charge of +1. As is always the case with chemistry there are a number of exceptions. The second Periodic Table presented in the video shows these exceptions. Overall the trend is the same as in the first method but more detailed. This video doesn’t explain why elements have specific ionic charges but it does give you the information you need to quickly and effectively understand how to find the ionic charge of an element. --- Drawing done in Adobe Illustrator and captured with Camtasia Studio on a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. Audio recording using a Yeti Blue microphone.
Views: 183705 Wayne Breslyn
Resonance
 
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Resonance in benzene and the carbonate ion More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=6XOm3Km7r30
Views: 635751 Khan Academy
Naming ions and ionic compounds
 
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Naming ions and ionic compounds
Views: 371597 Khan Academy
Calculating Ion Concentration in Solutions - Chemistry Tutor
 
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Get the full course at: http://www.MathTutorDVD.com Learn about ion concentration and related calculations in chemistry.
Views: 227900 mathtutordvd
Organic Chemistry - Ranking Acidity
 
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Organic Chemistry as a Second Language, David Klein
Views: 12720 Brian Schendt
Elements and atoms | Atoms, compounds, and ions | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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How elements relate to atoms. The basics of how protons, electrons and neutrons make up an atom. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/atomic-structure-and-properties/introduction-to-the-atom/v/atomic-number-mass-number-and-isotopes?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 3233638 Khan Academy
BCLN  - Hydrolysis of Salts - Chemistry
 
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The video shows how salts dissociate into ions that can either be neutral spectators, or undergo acid or base hydrolysis. Once the hydrolysis behavior of each ion is known, it can be determined whether the salt is acidic, basic, or neutral. The video goes through a few examples of salts and predicts whether they will be acidic, basic, or neutral in aqueous solution. http://www.BCLearningNetwork.com. 0:02assault 0:03is an eye on it compound consisting havoc at hand other than age bias 0:07and and and I N other than oooh minus you will show you all about hydraulic 0:13system by ins 0:14in Salt assault can either be acidic 0:18new char 0:20or basic depending on the hydraulic system but science 0:24were sometimes given the formula for assault and asked to determine whether 0:29it is acidic basic your new job 0:31when dissolved in water 0:34there is a step-by-step process we can use to determine whether a given salt is 0:39acidic basic your new Chou 0:41uniquely a solution 0:43step 1: used to write and dissociation equation for the salty 0:48in order to determine what it's cat eye and and and INR 0:53step 2: is to eliminate any spectator ions 0:58remember spectator cat eye and are the positive binds a group 1 1:02her alkali metals 1:04and group 2 are alkaline earth metals 1:08so the Zions are always neutral in a quiescent lucien 1:13the spectator and I and are the top five bands on the right side up the ass a 1:17table 1:19they are perchlorate iodide bromide 1:22chloride and nitrate 1:25designs do not react with water and are always new journal 1:29uniquely a solution 1:31we can list all the spectator cat in's and spectator and I and in a single box 1:37and use this whenever we have to determine whether assault is acidic 1:41basic or neutral 1:45it is a good idea to memorize the in order to save time later 1:49at this point you may want to pause the video take a screen shot at this 1:53and print it 1:58once we have eliminated the spectator ions the third step 2:02is to locate the remaining INR I and on the ass a table 2:07if the nine is not a spectator I N it means it must undergo 2:11either acid are Bayside real Asus herbal 2:16in chemistry 12 these are the fork at Heinz that hydrolyze 2:20they all undergo acid hydrolysates 2:26noticed that three hydrated cat eye ins I and three 2:30chromium 3 and aluminum can be depicted 2:34either in their hydrated or hacked ako for 2:37as shown here 2:41farm out simple I ins with 83 plus charge 2:47when you dissociated salt you're like me is the the scat I it's depicted 2:52in this simple form 2:56just keep in mind that if you need to write a hydraulic system equation 3:00for wanted these three you must convert them 3:03to their hydrated farm 3:08the other hydrolyze in cat I N ammonium 3:12always appears as an age four plus or in compound formulas 3:17as NH for 3:22now for an 3:23diane's and I hands are on the right side in the ass a table 3:27we start by looking at and I and that undergo 3:30on the base I draw lessons 3:34that's the Zions here 3:40excluding a spectator ions on the top rated as table 3:44these are all the in's on the right with the negative charge 3:47this formula do not start with an age 3:54at the break and I 3:55hands are the negative I N on the right side 3:58his foreign minister art with an agent 4:02at the protec- and I and undergo both acid in Bayside real assess 4:06what we have to do it the it to determine which I draw Asus is 4:11predominant 4:12how to do that is shown on the video hydraulics this 4:15a vampy prodi animes 4:19hear the anti prodi can I ins noticed their formulas all start with an H 4:25and they all had negative charges 4:32the fourth step up 4:34process comes into play in cases where both the cat I'm 4:37and and I and the salt idealize 4:42if both the cap and I and and and I am idealize 4:46we compare the value a bikini for the cat I N 4:49to the value at Kb for the anime 4:52in order to decide which I draw losses is predominant 4:57will go through an example love this later 5:01now we'll go through it the examples working with salt 5:05rest to determine whether the salt calcium nitrate
Views: 2176 W CLN
Electrochemistry Review - Cell Potential & Notation, Redox Half Reactions, Nernst Equation
 
01:27:17
This electrochemistry review video tutorial provides a lot of notes, equations, and formulas that you need to pass your next chemistry test / exam. It’s a nice video that provides an introduction or overview of electrochemistry including the most important fundamental topics and concepts. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. How To Calculate The Standard Cell Potential 2. Voltaic and Galvanic Cells vs Electrolytic Cells 3. Redox Half Reactions – Oxidation vs Reduction – Anode & Cathode Electrodes 4. Calculating Gibbs Free Energy Using The Cell Potential – delta G & Electrical Work 5. How To Find The Equilbrium Constant K Using Cell Potential and Delta G 6. Nernst Equation – Calculating Nonstandard Cell Potential Using Reaction Quotient Q 7. Calculating The Product Reactant Ratio Using The Cell Potential 8. The Purpose of Salt Bridge – Cations and Anions – Ionic Flow 9. How To Write The Standard Cell Notation For a Galvanic Cell 10. How To Balance Redox Reactions In Acidic Solution and Basic Solution 11. Electrolysis Problems – How To Find The Reactions That Occurs at The Anode and Cathode 12. How To Identify The Strongest Oxidizing Agent and Reducing Agent 13. How To Calculate The Oxidation State / Number 14. Spontaneity – Spontaneous and Nonspontaneous Redox Reactions 15. Equilibrium, Le Chatelier’s Principle and Cell Potential 16. The effect of Reactant and Product Concentration on The Cell Potential 17. Electrochemistry Stoichiometry Problems 18. How To Calculate the Current in Amps Given the mass in grams and the time in minutes 19. Q=It, Charge = Current x time – Faraday’s constant – 96485 Coulombs per mole of electrons 20. Mass in grams, Charge in Coulombs, Current in Amps, time in seconds